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Postoperative survival According to the Glasgow Prognostic Score in Patients with Resected Lung Adenocarcinoma

  • Machida, Yuichiro (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Sagawa, Motoyasu (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University) ;
  • Tanaka, Makoto (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Motono, Nozomu (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Matsui, Takuma (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Usuda, Katsuo (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Uramoto, Hidetaka (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University)
  • Published : 2016.10.01

Abstract

Background: The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) is calculated from measured CRP and albumin levels. We here evaluated the significance of the GPS in patients with resected pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Materials and Methods: The present study included 156 patients with lung adenocarcinoma who underwent lobectomy at Kanazawa Medical University between 2002 and 2012. Classification was into three groups: those with normal albumin (>=3.5 g/dl) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (<=1.0 mg/dl) levels were classified as GPS 0 (n =136), those with low albumin (<3.5 g/dl) or elevated CRP (>1.0 mg/dl) levels as GPS 1 (n = 16), and those with low albumin (<3.5 g/dl) and elevated CRP (>1.0 mg/dl) levels as GPS 2 (n = 4). We retrospectively investigated relationships between the patient characteristics including the GPS, and disease-free survival and cancer-specific survival. Results: The pathological stages of the patients were as follows: IA (n=78, 50%), IB (n=31, 19.9%), IIA (n=20.0, 12.8%), IIB (n=9.0, 5.7%), and IIIA (n=18.0, 11.5%). Lobectomy was performed in all cases. The average GPS was 0.15 (0-2) and showed significant relationships with stage and tumor size. The 2-year survival rates in patients with GPS0, 1 and 2 were 81.4%, 38.4%, and 25.0%, respectively. Clear correlations were noted with both cancer-specific survival and disease-free survival. Furthermore, multivariate analysis revealed that GPS was a significant prognostic factor. Conclusions: The GPS could be a prognostic factor for patients with resected pulmonary adenocarcinoma.

Keywords

Lung adenocarcinoma;glasgow prognostic score;prognosis

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