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Prevalence and Associated Factors of Abnormal Cervical Cytology and High-Risk HPV DNA among Bangkok Metropolitan Women

  • Tangjitgamol, Siriwan (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University) ;
  • Kantathavorn, Nuttavut (Section of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chulabhorn Hospital) ;
  • Kittisiam, Thannaporn (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University) ;
  • Chaowawanit, Woraphot (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University) ;
  • Phoolcharoen, Natacha (Section of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chulabhorn Hospital) ;
  • Manusirivithaya, Sumonmal (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University) ;
  • Khunnarong, Jakkapan (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University) ;
  • Srijaipracharoen, Sunamchok (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University) ;
  • Saeloo, Siriporn (Data Management Unit, Chulabhorn Hospital) ;
  • Krongthong, Waraporn (Data Management Unit, Chulabhorn Hospital) ;
  • Supawattanabodee, Busaba (Research Facilitation Unit, Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University) ;
  • Thavaramara, Thaovalai (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University) ;
  • Pataradool, Kamol (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University)
  • Published : 2016.07.01

Abstract

Background: Many strategies are required for cervical cancer reduction e.g. provision of education cautious sexual behavior, HPV vaccination, and early detection of pre-invasive cervical lesions and invasive cancer. Basic health data for cervical cytology/ HPV DNA and associated factors are important to make an appropriate policy to fight against cervical cancer. Aims: To assess the prevalence of abnormal cervical cytology and/or HPV DNA and associated factors, including sexual behavior, among Bangkok Metropolitan women. Materials and Methods: Thai women, aged 25-to-65 years old, had lived in Bangkok for ${\geq}5$ years were invited into the study. Liquid-based cervical cytology and HPV DNA tests were performed. Personal data were collected. Main Outcomes Measures: Rates of abnormal cytology and/ or high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) and factors associated with abnormal test (s) were studied. Results: Abnormal cytology and positive HR-HPV were found in 6.3% (279/4442 women) and 6.7% (295/4428), respectively. The most common abnormal cytology was ASC-US (3.5%) while the most common HR-HPV genotype was HPV 16 (1.4%) followed by HPV 52 (1.0%), HPV 58 (0.9%), and HPV 18 and HPV 51 at equal frequency (0.7%). Both tests were abnormal in 1.6% (71/4428 women). Rates of HR-HPV detection were directly associated with severity of abnormal cytology: 5.4% among normal cytology and 13.0%, 30.8%, 40.0%, 39.5%, 56.3% and 100.0% among ASC-US, ASC-H, AGC-NOS, LSIL, HSIL, and SCC, respectively. Some 5% of women who had no HR-HPV had abnormal cytology, in which 0.3% had ${\geq}$ HSIL. Factors associated with abnormal cytology or HR-HPV were: age ${\leq}40$ years, education lower than (for cytology) or higher than bachelor for HR-HPV), history of sexual intercourse, and sexual partners ${\geq}2$. Conclusions: Rates for abnormal cytology and HR-HPV detection were 6.3% and 6.7% HR-HPV detection was directly associated with severity of abnormal cytology. Significant associated factors were age ${\leq}40$ years, lower education, history of sexual intercourse, and sexual partners ${\geq}2$.

Keywords

Abnormal cervical cytology;high-risk HPV;education;sexual behavior

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