DOI QR코드

DOI QR Code

Characteristic of back fat and quality of longissimus dorsi muscle from soft fat pork carcasses

  • Lim, Daewoon (Korea Institute for Animal Products Quality Evaluation) ;
  • Song, Minho (Division of Animal & Dairy Science, Chungnam National University) ;
  • Lee, Juri (Division of Animal & Dairy Science, Chungnam National University) ;
  • Lee, Chulwoo (Division of Animal & Dairy Science, Chungnam National University) ;
  • Lee, Jaechung (Korea Institute for Animal Products Quality Evaluation) ;
  • Lee, Wangyeol (Korea Institute for Animal Products Quality Evaluation) ;
  • Seo, Jihee (Korea Institute for Animal Products Quality Evaluation) ;
  • Jung, Samooel (Division of Animal & Dairy Science, Chungnam National University)
  • Received : 2016.05.13
  • Accepted : 2016.06.29
  • Published : 2016.12.31

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of visual discrimination of soft fat pork carcasses when subjecting carcasses to quality grade evaluations. In addition, the quality of the longissimus dorsi muscle from soft fat carcasses was investigated. Iodine values of back fat from soft fat carcasses evaluated by visual discrimination were significantly higher than those from firm fat carcass (p < 0.05). However, those values were lower than the standard for soft fat (iodine value = 70). There were no significant differences in linoleic acid content, b-values, and L-values (p < 0.05) of back fat between firm and soft fat carcasses evaluated by visual discrimination. Color of longissimus dorsi muscle from soft fat carcasses (iodine value higher than 70) was not different from that of firm fat carcass (iodine value lower than 70). Except for linoleic acid, there were no significant differences in any fatty acid contents between longissimus dorsi muscles from firm fat and soft fat carcasses. Monounsaturated fatty acid content of longissimus dorsi muscles from soft fat carcasses was significantly lower than those of firm fat carcass (p < 0.05). However polyunsaturated fatty acid content was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in longissimus dorsi muscles from soft fat carcasses. In conclusion, visual discrimination results for soft fat pork carcass were inaccurate. Therefore, other indicators should be required to evaluate soft fat pork carcasses. In contrast, the quality of longissimus dorsi muscle from soft fat carcasses was superior in terms of fatty acid composition compared with that of firm fat carcasses.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : 농촌진흥청

References

  1. Apple, JK. 2010. Nutritional effect on pork quality in swine production. In National swine nutritional guide. pp. 288-299. U. S. Pork Center of Excellence (USPCE), Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.
  2. Barton-Gade PA. 1987. Meat and fat quality in boars, castrates and gilts. Livestock Production Science 16:187-196. https://doi.org/10.1016/0301-6226(87)90019-4
  3. Ellis BNR, Isbell HS. 1926. Soft pork studies. II The influence of the character of the ration upon the composition of the body fat of hogs. Journal of the oil and fat industry 3: 437. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02635271
  4. Folch J, Lees M, Sloane Stanley GH. 1957. A simple method for the isolation and purification of total lipids from animal tissues. The Journal of Biological chemistry 226:497-509.
  5. Ham B, Shelton R, Butler B, Thionville P. 1998. Calculation the iodine value for marine oils from fatty acid profiles. Journal of the American Oil Chemists Society 75:1445-1446. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11746-998-0197-2
  6. Jung Y, Jung S, Lee HJ, Kang M. Lee SK, Kim YJ, Jo C. 2012. Effect of high pressure after the addition of vegetable oil on the safety and quality of beef Loin. Korean Journal of Food Science and Animal Resource 32:68-76. https://doi.org/10.5851/kosfa.2012.32.1.68
  7. Krauss RM, Eckel RH, Howard B, Appel LJ, Daniels SR, Deckelbaum RJ, Erdman JW, Kris-Etherton P, Goldberg IJ, Kotchen TA, Lichtenstein AH, Mitch WE, Mullis R, Robinson K, Wylie-Rossett J, Jeor SS, Suttie J, Tribble DL, Bazzarre TL. 2001. Revision 2000: Statement for healthcare professionals from the nutrition committee of the American Heart Association. The Journal of Nutrition 131: 132-146. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/131.1.132
  8. Madden A, Jakobsen K, Nortensen NP. 1992. Influence of dietary fat on carcass fat quality in pigs. A review. Journal of Animal Science 42:220-225.
  9. Russo GL. 2009. Dietary n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: From biochemistry to clinical implications in cardiovascular prevention. Biochemical Pharmacology 77: 937-946. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bcp.2008.10.020
  10. Scislowski V, Bauchart D, Gruffat D, Laplaud PM, Durand D. 2005. Effect of dietary n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on peroxidizability of lipoproteins in steers. Lipid 40:1245-1256. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11745-005-1492-z
  11. Scott RA, Cornelius SG, Mersmann HJ. 1981. Fatty acid composition of adipose tissue from lean and obese swine. Journal of Animal Science 53:977-981. https://doi.org/10.2527/jas1981.534977x
  12. Seman DL, Barron WNG, Matzonger M. 2013. Evaluating the ability to measure pork fat quality for the production of commercial bacon. Meat Science 94:262-266. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.meatsci.2013.01.009
  13. Suzuki K, Ishida M, Kadowaki H, Shibata T, Uchida H, Nishida A. 2006. Genetic correlations among fatty acid compositions in different sites of fat tissues, meat production, and meat quality traits in Duroc pigs. Journal of Animal Science 84:2026-2034. https://doi.org/10.2527/jas.2005-660
  14. Whittington FM, Prescott NJ, Wood JD, Enser M. 1986. The effect of dietary linoleic acid on the firmness of backfat in pigs of 84 kg live weight. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 37:753-761. https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.2740370807
  15. Wood JD, Richardson RI, Nute GR, Fisher AV, Campo MM, Kasapidou E, Sheard PR, Enser M. 2003. Effects of fatty acids on meat quality: A review. Meat Science 66:21-32.