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Influence of Palm Kernel Meal Inclusion and Exogenous Enzyme Supplementation on Growth Performance, Energy Utilization, and Nutrient Digestibility in Young Broilers

  • Abdollahi, M.R. (Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University) ;
  • Hosking, B.J. (AsiaPac Biotechnology Co. Ltd.) ;
  • Ning, D. (AsiaPac Biotechnology Co. Ltd.) ;
  • Ravindran, V. (Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University)
  • Received : 2015.03.17
  • Accepted : 2015.07.30
  • Published : 2016.04.01

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of palm kernel meal (PKM) inclusion and exogenous enzyme supplementation on growth performance, nitrogen-corrected apparent metabolizable energy (AMEn), coefficient of apparent ileal digestibility (CAID) and total tract retention of nutrients in young broilers fed corn-based diets. Four inclusion levels of PKM (no PKM [PKM0], 8% [PKM8], 16% [PKM16], and 24% [PKM24]) and two enzyme additions were evaluated in a $4{\times}2$ factorial arrangement of treatments. A total of 384, one-d-old male broilers (Ross 308) were individually weighed and allocated to 48 cages (eight broilers/cage), and cages were randomly assigned to eight dietary treatments. Results indicated that the inclusion of 8% and 16% PKM increased (p<0.05) the weight gain compared to the PKM0 diet. Birds fed the PKM8 diets had the highest (p<0.05) feed intake. Weight gain and feed intake were severely reduced (p<0.05) by feeding the PKM24 diet. Enzyme supplementation increased weight gain (p<0.05), independent of PKM inclusion level. In PKM0 and PKM8 diets, enzyme addition significantly (p<0.05) lowered feed conversion ratio (FCR); whereas enzyme addition had no effect on FCR of birds fed PKM16 and PKM24 diets. In PKM0 and PKM16 diets, enzyme addition significantly (p<0.05) increased CAID of nitrogen and energy but had no effect in the PKM8 and PKM24 diets. Inclusion of PKM into the basal diet, irrespective of inclusion level, enhanced (p<0.05) starch and fat digestibility. Inclusion of PKM at 16% and 24% resulted in similar CAID of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) but higher (p<0.05) than that of the PKM0 and PKM8 diets. Enzyme addition, regardless of the level of PKM inclusion, significantly (p<0.05) increased CAID of NDF. There was a significant (p<0.05) decrease in AMEn with PKM inclusion of 24%. The present data suggest that inclusion of PKM in broiler diets could be optimized if PKM-containing diets are formulated based on digestible amino acid contents and supplemented with exogenous enzymes. If amino acid digestibility and AME of PKM considered in the formulation, it can be included in broiler diets up to 16% with no deleterious effects on growth performance.

Keywords

Palm Kernel Meal;Exogenous Enzyme;Broiler;Performance;Nutrient Utilization

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