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Development of an Accident Consequence Assessment Code for Evaluating Site Suitability of Light- and Heavy-water Reactors Based on the Korean Technical Standards

  • Hwang, Won Tae (Nuclear Environment Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) ;
  • Jeong, Hae Sun (Nuclear Environment Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) ;
  • Jeong, Hyo Joon (Nuclear Environment Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) ;
  • Kil, A Reum (Nuclear Environment Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) ;
  • Kim, Eun Han (Nuclear Environment Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) ;
  • Han, Moon Hee (Nuclear Environment Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute)
  • Received : 2016.07.17
  • Accepted : 2016.10.31
  • Published : 2016.12.31

Abstract

Background: Methodologies for a series of radiological consequence assessments show a distinctive difference according to the design principles of the original nuclear suppliers and their technical standards to be imposed. This is due to the uncertainties of the accidental source term, radionuclide behavior in the environment, and subsequent radiological dose. Both types of PWR and PHWR are operated in Korea. However, technical standards for evaluating atmospheric dispersion have been enacted based on the U.S. NRC's positions regardless of the reactor types. For this reason, it might cause a controversy between the licensor and licensee of a nuclear power plant. Materials and Methods: It was modelled under the framework of the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.145 for light-water reactors, reflecting the features of heavy-water reactors as specified in the Canadian National Standard and the modelling features in MACCS2, such as atmospheric diffusion coefficient, ground deposition, surface roughness, radioactive plume depletion, and exposure from ground deposition. Results and Discussion: An integrated accident consequence assessment code, ACCESS (Accident Consequence Assessment Code for Evaluating Site Suitability), was developed by taking into account the unique regulatory positions for reactor types under the framework of the current Korean technical standards. Field tracer experiments and hand calculations have been carried out for validation and verification of the models. Conclusion: The modelling approaches of ACCESS and its features are introduced, and its applicative results for a hypothetical accidental scenario are comprehensively discussed. In an applicative study, the predicted results by the light-water reactor assessment model were higher than those by other models in terms of total doses.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning of Korea

References

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