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Review and Current Status of Opisthorchis viverrini Infection at the Community Level in Thailand

  • Kaewpitoon, Natthawut (Faculty of Public Health, Vongchavalitkul University) ;
  • Kootanavanichpong, Nusorn (Faculty of Public Health, Vongchavalitkul University) ;
  • Kompor, Ponthip (Faculty of Public Health, Vongchavalitkul University) ;
  • Chavenkun, Wasugree (Faculty of Public Health, Vongchavalitkul University) ;
  • Kujapun, Jirawoot (Faculty of Public Health, Vongchavalitkul University) ;
  • Norkaew, Jun (Faculty of Public Health, Vongchavalitkul University) ;
  • Ponphimai, Sukanya (Faculty of Public Health, Vongchavalitkul University) ;
  • Matrakool, Likit (Suranaree University of Technology Hospital) ;
  • Tongtawee, Taweesak (Suranaree University of Technology Hospital) ;
  • Panpimanmas, Sukij (Suranaree University of Technology Hospital) ;
  • Rujirakul, Ratana (Parasitic Disease Research, Suranaree University of Technology) ;
  • Padchasuwan, Natnapa (Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University) ;
  • Pholsripradit, Poowadol (Provincial Public Health of Nakhon Ratchasima) ;
  • Eksanti, Thawatchai (Nakhon Ratchasima Rajabhat University) ;
  • Phatisena, Tanida (Nakhon Ratchasima Rajabhat University) ;
  • Loyd, Ryan A (Suranaree University of Technology Hospital) ;
  • Kaewpitoon, Soraya J (Suranaree University of Technology Hospital)
  • Published : 2015.11.04

Abstract

Opisthorchis viverrini is remains a public health problem in Thailand, particularly in the northeast and north regions which have the highest incidences of chonalgiocarcinoma (CCA). O. viverrini causes the disease opithorchiasis, and its has been classified as a group 1 biological carcinogen. Humans, dogs, and cats become infected with O. viverrini by ingesting raw or undercooked fish containing infective metacercariae. The first human cases of O. viverrini infection were reported in Thailand 100 years ago, and it's still a problem at the community level. Based on data for the year 2009, more than 6 million people were infected with O. viverrini. Associated medical care and loss of wages in Thailand costs about $120 million annually. This review highlights the current status of O. viverrini infection in communities of Thailand through active surveillance for the five years period from 2010 and 2015. A total of 17 community-based surveys were conducted, most in the northeast region. Some 7 surveys demonstrated a high prevalence over 20%, and the highest was 45.7%. Most commonly infection was found in age group of 35 years and older, males, and agricultural workers. Although, the national prevalence may be decreasing but the results show that the O. viverrini infection is still high in communities of the northeast region. Therefore, the focus in populations living in northeast Thailand should be screening of infection and changing their eating behavior.

Keywords

Opisthorchis viverrini;current status;Thailand

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