DOI QR코드

DOI QR Code

Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Regarding Cervical Cancer Screening Among Village Health Volunteers

  • Srisuwan, Siriwan (Gynaecologic Oncology Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University) ;
  • Puapornpong, Pawin (Gynaecologic Oncology Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University) ;
  • Srisuwan, Supattra (Department of Agricultural Extension and Communication, Faculty of Agriculture, Kasetsart University) ;
  • Bhamarapravatana, Kornkarn (Department of Preclinical science, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University) ;
  • Suwannarurk, Komsun (Gynaecologic Oncology Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University)
  • Published : 2015.04.14

Abstract

Background: In the years 2014, coverage rates of cervical cancer screening in Nakornnayok province accounted to 76.5%. This was lower than the government's specified goal of 80%. Community health volunteers are members of a Thai healthcare alliance established to help promoting healthcare service communication and collaboration at the primary level. Such village health volunteers (VHVs) are established in most villages. Objective: To assess the knowledge and attitudes of cervical cancer screening among VHVs. Materials and Methods: The subjects were 128 VHVs from four Nakornnayok sub-districts; namely KlongYai, Chomphol, Buangsan and Suksara, Thailand. The study was conducted from December 2014 to January 2015. The questionnaire was designed to assess the knowledge and attitude of cervical cancer screening provided by the VHVs. In addition, cervical cancer screening coverage rates of each area were collected. The demographic data, scores of knowledge, attitudes, practices and the cervical cancer screening coverage rates were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results: The questionnaire reliability was assessed as 0.81. The total knowledge and attitude scores were 10 and 15 points. The mean knowledge scores of KlongYai, Chomphol, Buangsan and Suksara were 6.8, 7.0, 6.5 and 9.0 points, respectively. The VHVs had a high level of overall knowledge about cervical cancer screening. The mean attitude scores were 12.4, 13.2, 13.4 and 13.1 points. VHVs had a positive attitude to the promotion of cervical cancer screening at the overall level. The percentages of VHVs promoting cervical cancer information in respective districts were 72.2, 94.3, 94.9 and 50.0. However, the cervical cancer screening coverage rates were 62.4%, 34.7%, 80.3% and 47.3% respectively. Conclusions: The knowledge, attitudes and percentages of promoting information of cervical cancer screening among VHVs in the four sub-districts were high but did not correlate with the cervical screening coverage rates for each area. VHVs needed to understand socio-cultural beliefs of the women in the target population and design suitable strategies to encourage higher cervical screening coverage.

Keywords

Cervical screening;knowledge;attitudes and practices;village health

References

  1. Abdullahi A, Copping J, Kessel A, et al (2009). Cervical screening: Perceptions and barriers to uptake among Somali women in Camden. Public Health, 123, 680-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2009.09.011
  2. Baskaran P, Subramanian P, Rahman RA, et al (2013). Perceived susceptibility, and cervical cancer screening benefits and barriers in Malaysian women visiting outpatient clinics. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, 14, 7693-9. https://doi.org/10.7314/APJCP.2013.14.12.7693
  3. Budkaew J, Chumworathayi B, (2014). Factors associated with decisions to attend cervical cancer screening among women aged 30-60 years in Chatapadung Contracting Medical Unit, Thailand. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, 15, 4903-7. https://doi.org/10.7314/APJCP.2014.15.12.4903
  4. Chesun A, Harncharoen K, Taechaboonsermsak P, et al (2012). Factors related with cervical cancer screening test among Thai Muslim women in Satun province. Asia J Public Health, 3, 79-85.
  5. Chumworathayi B, Yuenyao P, Luanratanakorn S, et al (2007). Can an appointment-letter intervention increase Pap smear screening in Samliem, Khon Kaen, Thailand? Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, 8, 353-6.
  6. Guimond ME, Salman K (2013). Modesty matters: cultural sensitivity and cervical cancer prevention in Muslim women in the United States. Nurs Women's Health, 17, 210-6. https://doi.org/10.1111/1751-486X.12034
  7. Lu M, Moritz S, Lorenzetti D, et al (2012). A systematic review of interventions to increase breast and cervical cancer screening uptake among Asian women. BMC Public Health, 12, 413. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-12-413
  8. Oranratanaphan S, Amatyakul P, Iramaneerat K, et al (2010). Knowledge, attitudes and practices about the Pap smear among medical workers in Naresuan University Hospital, Thailand. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, 11, 1727-30.
  9. Schoueri-Mychasiw N, McDonald PW (2013). Factors associated with under screening for cervical cancer among women in Canada. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, 14, 6445-50. https://doi.org/10.7314/APJCP.2013.14.11.6445
  10. The Eleventh National Economic and Social Development Plan, 2012-2016, http://www.nesdb.go.th/Portals/0/news/plan/p11/SummaryPlan11_Eng.pdf.
  11. Waller J, Bartoszek M, Marlow L, et al (2009). Barriers to cervical cancer screening attendance in England: a population-based survey. J Med Screen, 16, 199-204. https://doi.org/10.1258/jms.2009.009073
  12. Wilailak S (2009). Epidemiologic report of gynecologic cancer in Thailand. Gynecol Oncol, 20, 81-3. https://doi.org/10.3802/jgo.2009.20.2.81

Cited by

  1. Arsenic Exposure and Haematological Derangement in Cervical Cancer Cases in India vol.16, pp.15, 2015, https://doi.org/10.7314/APJCP.2015.16.15.6397
  2. Low Coverage and Disparities of Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening in Thai Women: Analysis of National Representative Household Surveys vol.16, pp.18, 2016, https://doi.org/10.7314/APJCP.2015.16.18.8541