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Imaging Anatomy of Waldeyer's Ring and PET/CT and MRI Findings of Oropharyngeal Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  • Zhang, Chun-Xing (Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital) ;
  • Liang, Long (Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital) ;
  • Zhang, Bin (Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital) ;
  • Chen, Wen-Bo (Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital) ;
  • Liu, Hong-Jun (Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital) ;
  • Liu, Chun-Ling (Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital) ;
  • Zhou, Zheng-Gen (Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital) ;
  • Liang, Chang-Hong (Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital) ;
  • Zhang, Shui-Xing (Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital)
  • Published : 2015.04.29

Abstract

Background: This study was conducted to analyze positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performance with oropharyngeal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (ONHL).Materials and Methods: The complete image data of 30 ONHL cases were analyzed, all patients were performed PET / CT and MRI examination before the treatment, with the time interval of these two inspections not exceeding 14 days. The distribution, morphology, MRI signal characteristics, enhancement feature, standardized uptake value (SUV) max value and lymph node metastasis way of the lesions were analyzed. Results: Among the 30 cases, 23 cases were derived from the B-cell (76.7%), 5 cases were derived from the peripheral T cells (16.7%) and 2 cases were derived from the NK/T cells (6.7%). 19 cases exhibited the palatine tonsil involvement (63.3%). As for the lesion appearance, 10 cases appeared as mass, 8 cases were the diffused type and 12 cases were the mixed type. 25 cases exhibited the SUVmax value of PET / CT primary lesions as 11 or more (83.3%). MRI showed that all patients exhibited various degrees of parapharyngeal side-compressed narrowing, but MRI still exhibited the high-signal fat, and the oropharyngeal mucosa was intact. 25 cases were associated with the neck lymph node metastasis, among who 22 cases had no necrosis in the metastatic lymph nodes, while the rest 3 cases exhibited the central necrosis in the metastatic lymph nodes. Conclusions: PET / CT and MRI have important value in diagnosing and determining the lesion extent of ONHL.

Keywords

Oropharynx;lymphoma;anatomy;PET / CT;magnetic resonance imaging

Acknowledgement

Supported by : National Scientific Foundation of China, Guangdong Science Foundation

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