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Consanguinity Protecting Effect Against Breast Cancer among Tunisian Women: Analysis of BRCA1 Haplotypes

  • Medimegh, Imen (Laboratory of Genetics, Immunology and Human Pathology, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, University El Manar) ;
  • Troudi, Wafa (Laboratory of Genetics, Immunology and Human Pathology, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, University El Manar) ;
  • Omrane, Ines (Laboratory of Genetics, Immunology and Human Pathology, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, University El Manar) ;
  • Ayari, Hajer (Laboratory of Genetics, Immunology and Human Pathology, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, University El Manar) ;
  • Uhrhummer, Nancy (Laboratoire de Diagnostic Genetique et Moleculaire) ;
  • Majoul, Hamdi (Laboratory of Genetics, Immunology and Human Pathology, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, University El Manar) ;
  • Benayed, Farhat (Salah Azaiez Institute of Carcinology of Tunis) ;
  • Mezlini, Amel (Salah Azaiez Institute of Carcinology of Tunis) ;
  • Bignon, Yves-Jean (Laboratoire de Diagnostic Genetique et Moleculaire) ;
  • Sibille, Catherine (Laboratory of Molecular Genetic of Hereditary Pathologies) ;
  • Elgaaied, Amel Benammar (Laboratory of Genetics, Immunology and Human Pathology, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, University El Manar)
  • Published : 2015.05.18

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of consanguinity on breast cancer incidence in Tunisia. We conducted a case-control study to evaluate the involvement of heterozygote and homozygote haplotypes of BRCA1 gene SNPs according to consanguinity among 40 cases of familial breast cancer, 46 cases with sporadic breast cancer and 34 healthy controls. We showed significant difference in consanguinity rate between breast cancer patients versus healthy controls P=0.001. Distribution of homozygous BRCA1 haplotypes among healthy women versus breast cancer patients was significantly different; p=0.02. Parental consanguinity seems to protect against breast cancer in the Tunisian population.

Keywords

Consanguinity;breast cancer;BRCA1;Tunisian patients

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