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Influence of Rapeseed Meal on Growth Performance, Blood Profiles, Nutrient Digestibility and Economic Benefit of Growing-finishing Pigs

  • Choi, H.B. (Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, College of Animal Life Sciences, Seoul National University) ;
  • Jeong, J.H. (Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, College of Animal Life Sciences, Seoul National University) ;
  • Kim, D.H. (Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, College of Animal Life Sciences, Seoul National University) ;
  • Lee, Y. (Department of Food and Nutrition, Seoul National University) ;
  • Kwon, H. (Department of Food and Nutrition, Seoul National University) ;
  • Kim, Y.Y. (Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, College of Animal Life Sciences, Seoul National University)
  • Received : 2014.10.15
  • Accepted : 2015.06.02
  • Published : 2015.09.01

Abstract

This study was conducted to investigate the influence of dietary rapeseed meal (RSM) on growth performance, blood profiles, nutrient digestibility and economic benefit of growing-finishing pigs. A total of 120 growing pigs ($[Yorkshire{\times}Landrace]{\times}Duroc$) with an initial body weight (BW) $29.94{\pm}0.06kg$ were used in this experiment. Pigs were randomly allotted into 1 of 5 treatments in a randomized complete block design and 6 replicates with 4 pigs per pen. Treatments were divided by dietary RSM supplementation levels (0%, 3%, 6%, 9%, or 12%) in growing-finishing diets. A linear decrease (p<0.05) of BW and average daily gain (ADG) were observed at 13th wk of finishing and overall periods of pigs. Additionally, gain-to-feed ratio (G/F) tended to decrease by dietary RSM supplementation in growing-finishing diets (linear, p = 0.07 and quadratic, p = 0.08). Concentrations of serum triiodothyronine and thyroxine were not influenced by dietary RSM treatments whereas thyroid gland and liver weight were increased at 13th wk of finishing period (linear, p<0.05; p<0.01) by increasing dietary RSM supplementation level. In blood profiles, serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations were not differed by dietary treatments at 13th wk of finishing period whereas concentration of serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol was affected by the supplementation level of RSM, resulting in a linear RSM level responses (p<0.05). Serum blood urea nitrogen concentration tended to decrease (linear, p = 0.07; p = 0.08) at 6th wk of growing and 13th wk of finishing periods and digestibility of dry matter tended to decrease by dietary RSM (linear, p = 0.09). Crude protein, crude fat and nitrogen retention, whereas, were not affected by dietary RSM supplementation level. In the economic analysis, feed cost per weight gain was numerically decreased when RSM was provided up to 9%. Consequently, RSM could be supplemented to growing-finishing diets up to 9% ($3.07{\mu}mol/g\;Gls$) without detrimental effects on growth performance of growing-finishing pigs.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Nonghyup feed Inc.

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