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Interferon-γ and Interleukin-10 Gene Polymorphisms are not Predictors of Chronic Hepatitis C (Genotype-4) Disease Progression

  • Bahgat, Nermine Ahmed (Clinical and Chemical Pathology Department, Faculty of medicine, Cairo University) ;
  • Kamal, Manal Mohamed (Clinical and Chemical Pathology Department, Faculty of medicine, Cairo University) ;
  • Abdelaziz, Ashraf Omar (Endemic medicine and Hepatogastroenterology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University) ;
  • Mohye, Mohamed Ahmed (Endemic medicine and Hepatogastroenterology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University) ;
  • Shousha, Hend Ibrahim (Endemic medicine and Hepatogastroenterology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University) ;
  • ahmed, Mae Mohamed (Clinical and Chemical Pathology Department, Faculty of medicine, Cairo University) ;
  • Elbaz, Tamer Mahmoud (Endemic medicine and Hepatogastroenterology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University) ;
  • Nabil, Mohamed Mahmoud (Endemic medicine and Hepatogastroenterology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University)
  • Published : 2015.07.13

Abstract

Immunoregulatory cytokines have an influence on hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection outcome. This study aimed to determine whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in IFN- ${\gamma}$ and IL-10 genes are associated with susceptibility and/or are markers of prognosis regarding chronic hepatitis C outcomes. IFN ${\gamma}$ (+874T/A) and IL-10 (-1082G/A) genotypes were determined in 75 HCV genotype 4 patients with different disease severities (chronic hepatitis, n=25, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on top of liver cirrhosis, n=50) and 25 healthy participants using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. No statistical differences in allele or genotype distributions of IFN ${\gamma}$ and IL-10 genes were detected between patients and controls or between patientgroups. No significant difference in the frequency of IL-10 SNP at position -1082 or IFN-${\gamma}$ at position +874T/A was found between chronic HCV genotype 4 and with progression of disease severity in liver cirrhosis or HCC. In conclusion; interferon-${\gamma}$ and interleukin-10 gene polymorphisms are not predictors of disease progression in patients with chronic hepatitis C (Genotype-4).

Keywords

Chronic hepatitis C;single nucleotide polymorphism;IFN-${\gamma}$;IL-10;HCV genotype 4

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