DOI QR코드

DOI QR Code

Effect of Age on Energy Requirement for Maintenance and Growth of Dorper and Hu Crossbred F1 Ewes Weighing 20 to 50 kg

  • Nie, H.T. (Jiangsu Engineering Technology Research Center of Meat Sheep and Goat Industry, College of Animal Science, Nanjing Agricultural University) ;
  • Wan, Y.J. (Research center of Haimen Goats, College of Animal Science, Nanjing Agricultural University) ;
  • You, J.H. (Jiangsu Engineering Technology Research Center of Meat Sheep and Goat Industry, College of Animal Science, Nanjing Agricultural University) ;
  • Wang, Z.Y. (Jiangsu Engineering Technology Research Center of Meat Sheep and Goat Industry, College of Animal Science, Nanjing Agricultural University) ;
  • Lan, S. (Jiangsu Engineering Technology Research Center of Meat Sheep and Goat Industry, College of Animal Science, Nanjing Agricultural University) ;
  • Fan, Y.X. (Jiangsu Engineering Technology Research Center of Meat Sheep and Goat Industry, College of Animal Science, Nanjing Agricultural University) ;
  • Wang, F. (Jiangsu Engineering Technology Research Center of Meat Sheep and Goat Industry, College of Animal Science, Nanjing Agricultural University)
  • Received : 2014.05.28
  • Accepted : 2014.08.31
  • Published : 2015.08.01

Abstract

This research aimed to define the energy requirement of Dorper and Hu Hybrid $F_1$ ewes 20 to 50 kg of body weight, furthermore to study energy requirement changes with age and evaluate the effect of age on energy requirement parameters. In comparative slaughter trial, thirty animals were divided into three dry matter intake treatments (ad libitum, n = 18; low restricted, n = 6; high restricted, n = 6), and were all slaughtered as baseline, intermediate, and final slaughter groups, to calculate body chemical components and energy retained. In digestibility trial, twelve ewes were housed in individual metabolic cages and randomly assigned to three feeding treatments in accordance with the design of a comparative slaughter trial, to evaluate dietary energetic values at different feed intake levels. The combined data indicated that, with increasing age, the net energy requirement for maintenance ($NE_m$) decreased from $260.62{\pm}13.21$ to $250.61{\pm}11.79kJ/kg^{0.75}$ of shrunk body weight (SBW)/d, and metabolizable energy requirement for maintenance (MEm) decreased from $401.99{\pm}20.31$ to $371.23{\pm}17.47kJ/kg^{0.75}$ of SBW/d. Partial efficiency of ME utilization for maintenance ($k_m$, 0.65 vs 0.68) and growth ($k_g$, 0.42 vs 0.41) did not differ (p>0.05) due to age; At the similar condition of average daily gain, net energy requirements for growth ($NE_g$) and metabolizable energy requirements for growth ($ME_g$) for ewes during late fattening period were 23% and 25% greater than corresponding values of ewes during early fattening period. In conclusion, the effect of age upon energy requirement parameters in the present study were similar in tendency with previous recommendations, values of energy requirement for growth ($NE_g$ and $ME_g$) for Dorper and Hu crossbred female lambs ranged between the NRC (2007) recommendation for early and later maturating growing sheep.

Keywords

Comparative Slaughter;Net Energy Requirement;Metabolizable Energy Requirement;Fattening Period;Age;Ewe

References

  1. Seve, B. and A. A. Ponter. 1997. Nutrient-hormone signals regulating muscle protein turnover in pigs. Proc. Nutr. Soc. 56:565-580. https://doi.org/10.1079/PNS19970058
  2. Silva, A. M. A., A. G. da Silva Sobrinho, I. A. C. M. Trindade, K. T. Resende, and O. A. Bakke. 2003. Net requirements of protein and energy for maintenance of wool and hair lambs in a tropical region. Small Rumin. Res. 49:165-171. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0921-4488(03)00100-7
  3. Tyler, N. J. C., P. Fauchald, O. Johansen, and H. R. Christiansen. 1999. Seasonal inappetence and weight loss in female reindeer in winter. Ecol. Bull. 47:105-116.
  4. Van Soest, P. J., J. B. Robertson, and B. A. Lewis. 1991. Methods for dietary fiber, neutral detergent fiber, and nonstarch polysaccharides in relation to animal nutrition. J. Dairy Sci. 74:3583-3597. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(91)78551-2
  5. Xu, G. S. 2012. Study on Energy and Protein Requirements of 20 to 35kg Dorper and thin-tailed Han Crossbred Lambs. PhD Thesis. Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China (In Chinese).
  6. Rhind, S., Z. Archer, and C. Adam. 2002. Seasonality of food intake in ruminants: Recent developments in understanding. Nutr. Res. 15:43-65. https://doi.org/10.1079/NRR200236
  7. Suttie, J. M., and J. R. Webster. 1995. Extreme seasonal growth in arctic deer: comparisons and control mechanisms. Am. Zool. 35:215-221. https://doi.org/10.1093/icb/35.3.215
  8. AFRC. 1993. Energy and Protein Requirements of Ruminants: An Advisory Manual Prepared by the AFRC Technical Committee on Responses to Nutrients. CAB International, Wallingford, UK.
  9. AOAC. 1990. Official Methods of Analysis. Association of Official Analytical Chemists Inc.Washington, DC, USA.
  10. ARC. 1980. The Nutrient Requirements of Ruminant Livestock. Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux, Slough, UK.
  11. Blaxter, K. L. and J. L. Clapperton. 1965. Prediction of the amount of methane produced by ruminants. Br. J. Nutr. 19: 511-522. https://doi.org/10.1079/BJN19650046
  12. Cannas, A., L. O. Tedeschi, D. G. Fox, A. N. Pell, and P. J. Van Soest. 2004. A mechanistic model for predicting the nutrient requirements and feed biological values for sheep. J. Anim. Sci. 82:149-169. https://doi.org/10.2527/2004.821149x
  13. CSIRO. 2007. Nutrient Requirements of Domesticated Ruminants. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Publishing; Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
  14. Dawson, L. E. R. and R. W. J. Steen. 1998. Estimation of maintenance energy requirements of beef cattle and sheep. J. Agric. Sci. 131: 477-485. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0021859698005942
  15. Deng, K. D., Q. Y. Diao, C. G. Jiang, Y. Tu, N. F. Zhang, J. Liu, T. Ma, Y. G. Zhao, and G. S. Xu. 2012. Energy requirements for maintenance and growth of Dorper crossbred ram lambs. Livest. Sci. 150:102-110. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.livsci.2012.08.006
  16. Fernandes, M. H. M. R., K. T. Resende, L. O. Tedeschi, J. S. Fernandes, H. M. Silva, G. E. Carstens, T. T. Berchielli, I. A. M. A. Teixeira, and L. Akinaga. 2007. Energy and protein requirements for maintenance and growth of Boer crossbred kids. J. Anim. Sci. 85:1014-1023. https://doi.org/10.2527/jas.2006-110
  17. Freetly, H. C., J. A. Nienaber, and T. M. Brown-Brandl. 2003. Relationship between aging and nutritionally controlled growth rate on heat production of heifers. J. Anim. Sci. 81:1847-1852. https://doi.org/10.2527/2003.8171847x
  18. Galvani, D. B., C. C. Pires, G. V. Kozloski, and T. P. Wommer. 2008. Energy requirements of Texel crossbred lambs. J. Anim. Sci. 86:3480-3490. https://doi.org/10.2527/jas.2008-1097
  19. Garrett, W. 1980. Factors influencing energetic efficiency of beef production. J. Anim. Sci. 51:1434-1440. https://doi.org/10.2527/jas1981.5161434x
  20. Ji, S. K., G. S. Xu, C. G. Jiang, K. D. Deng, Y. Tu, N. F. Zhang, T. Ma, C. Lou, and Q. Y. Diao. 2013. Net phosphorus requirements of Dorper$\times$ Thin-tailed han crossbred ram lambs. Asian Australas. J. Anim. Sci. 26:1282-1288. https://doi.org/10.5713/ajas.2012.12634
  21. Kamalzadeh, A. and A. Shabani. 2007. Maintenance and growth requirements for energy and nitrogen of Baluchi sheep. Int. J. Agric. Biol. (Pakistan).
  22. NRC. 2007. Nutrient requirements of small ruminants: Sheep, goats, cervids, and new world camelids. Natl. Acad. Press Washington, DC, USA.
  23. Pires, C. C., L. F. D. Silva, and L. M. Bonnecarrere Sanchez. 2000. Corporal composition and nutritional requirements for energy and protein of growing lambs. Rev. Bras. Zootec. 29:853-860. https://doi.org/10.1590/S1516-35982000000300031
  24. Prieto, C., J. F. Aguilera, L. Lara, and J. Fonolla. 1990. Protein and energy requirements for maintenance of indigenous Granadina goats. Br. J. Nutr. 63:155-163. https://doi.org/10.1079/BJN19900103

Cited by

  1. Energy requirements of early-weaned Dorper cross-bred female lambs vol.100, pp.6, 2016, https://doi.org/10.1111/jpn.12481