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Effect of Hormone Therapy on Long-term Outcomes of Patients with Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-and Hormone Receptor-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer: Real World Experience in China

  • Du, Feng (Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Yuan, Peng (Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Wang, Jia-Yu (Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Ma, Fei (Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Fan, Ying (Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Luo, Yang (Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Xu, Bing-He (Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences)
  • Published : 2015.03.04

Abstract

Background: Among human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer, more than half are also hormone receptor (HR)-positive. Although HR is a predictive factor for the efficacy of hormone therapy, there are still some uncertainties in regard to the effects on patients with HR-positive and HER2-positive metastatic breast cancers due to the potential resistance to hormone therapy caused by co-expression of HR and HER2. There are no clinical trials directly comparing the efficacy of hormonal therapy with chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: To examine the real-world effect of hormone therapy on patients with HR-positive and HER2-positive metastatic breast cancers, a cross-sectional study of a representative sample of the Chinese population was conducted. The study included 113 patients who received first-line and second-line palliative treatment between 2005 and 2010 in the Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science. The effect of hormone therapy on overall survival (OS) was studied. Results: The patients who received hormone therapy (n=51) had better overall survival in contrast to those who received chemotherapy with anti-HER2 therapy (n=62) in first- or second-line treatment. The difference was of borderline statistical significance (51.8m vs 31.9m, p=0.065). In addition, the effect of hormone therapy did not differ significantly with other prognostic factors, including age (${\leq}50$ years or >50 years), disease free survival (${\geq}2$ years or < 2 years) and site of metastasis (visceral or bone/soft tissue). On multivariate analysis, administration of hormone therapy was associated with a trend toward a favorable prognosis (p=0.148, HR=0.693, 95%CI 0.422-1.139). Age more than 50 years was the sole independent harmful prognostic factor (p<0.001, HR=2.797, 95%CI 1.676-4.668). Conclusions: Our data suggest that hormonel therapy may improve outcomes of the patients with ER-positive and HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

Keywords

Breast neoplasm;hormonal receptor;human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 chemotherapy

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