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Regulatory mechanism of Angelica Gigas extract powder on matrix metalloproteinases in vitro and in vivo model

참당귀 추출분말이 in vitro and in vivo model에서 MMPs 조절 기전

  • Received : 2015.10.21
  • Accepted : 2015.11.13
  • Published : 2015.12.25

Abstract

The precise mechanism underlying the therapeutic efficacy of an extraction powder of Angelica gigas (AGE) for the treatment of degenerative osteoarthritis was investigated in primary cultured rabbit chondrocytes and in a monosodium-iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis rat model. The treatment with AGE (50 μg/mL) effectively inhibited NF-B activation. The anti-inflammatory mechanism was clarified by gelatin zymography and western blotting measurements of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activities. The AGE (50 μg/mL) treatment significantly reduced MMP-9 activity. The constituents of AGE— decursinol, decursin, and decursinol angelate—were determined by LC-MS/MS after a 24 hr treatment of rabbit chondrocytes. The contents of the major products, decursin and decursinol angelate, were 3.62±0.47 and 2.14 ±0.36 μg/mg protein, respectively in AGE-treated (50 μg/mL) rabbit chondrocytes. An in vivo animal study on rats fed a diet containing 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg AGE for 3 weeks revealed a significant inhibition of the MMPs in the MIA-induced rat articular cartilage. The genetic expression of arthritic factors in the articular cartilage was examined by RT-PCR of collagen Type I, collagen Type II, aggrecan, and MMP (MMP3, MMP-9, MMP13). Specifically, AGE up-regulated the expression of collagen Type I, collagen Type II, and aggrecan and inhibited MMP levels at all tested concentrations. Collectively, AGE showed a strong specific site of action on MMP regulation and protected against the degeneration of articular cartilage via cellular regulation of MMP expression both in vitro and in vivo.

Keywords

Angelica gigas;osteoarthritis;MMPs;Decursin;Decursinol angelate;ectract

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