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Number of Mediastinal Lymph Nodes as a Prognostic Factor in PN2 Non Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Single Centre Experience and Review of the Literature

  • Takanen, Silvia (Department of Radiation Oncology, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, "Sapienza" University of Rome) ;
  • Bangrazi, Caterina (Department of Radiation Oncology, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, "Sapienza" University of Rome) ;
  • Graziano, Vanessa (Department of Radiation Oncology, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, "Sapienza" University of Rome) ;
  • Parisi, Alessandro (Department of Radiation Oncology, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, "Sapienza" University of Rome) ;
  • Resuli, Blerina (Department of Radiation Oncology, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, "Sapienza" University of Rome) ;
  • Simione, Luca (Department of Radiation Oncology, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, "Sapienza" University of Rome) ;
  • Caiazzo, Rossella (Department of Radiation Oncology, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, "Sapienza" University of Rome) ;
  • Raffetto, Nicola (Department of Radiation Oncology, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, "Sapienza" University of Rome) ;
  • Tombolini, Vincenzo (Department of Radiation Oncology, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, "Sapienza" University of Rome)
  • Published : 2014.10.11

Abstract

Currently the most important prognostic factor in lung cancer is the stage. In the current lung TNM classification system, N category is defined exclusively by anatomic nodal location though, in other type of tumours, number of lymph nodes is confirmed to be a fundamental prognostic factor. Therefore we evaluated the number of mediastinal lymph nodes as a prognostic factor in locally advanced NSCLC after multimodality treatment, observing a significant effect of the number of lymph nodes in terms of OS (p<0.01) and DFS (p<0.001): patients with a low number of positive mediastinal nodes have a better prognosis.

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