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Recurrence and Metastasis of Lung Cancer Demonstrate Decreased Diffusion on Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  • Usuda, Katsuo (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Sagawa, Motoyasu (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Motomo, Nozomu (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Ueno, Masakatsu (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Tanaka, Makoto (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Machida, Yuichiro (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Maeda, Sumiko (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Matoba, Munetaka (Department of Radiology, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Tonami, Hisao (Department of Radiology, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Ueda, Yoshimichi (Department of Pathophysiological and Experimental Pathology, Kanazawa Medical University) ;
  • Sakuma, Tsutomu (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kanazawa Medical University)
  • Published : 2014.08.30

Abstract

Background: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is reported to be useful for detecting malignant lesions. The purpose of this study is to clarify characteristics of imaging, detection rate and sensitivity of DWI for recurrence or metastasis of lung cancer. Methods: A total of 36 lung cancer patients with recurrence or metastasis were enrolled in this study. While 16 patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), 17 underwent MRI and CT, and 3 underwent MRI and PET-CT. Results: Each recurrence or metastasis showed decreased diffusion, which was easily recognized in DWI. The detection rate for recurrence or metastasis was 100% (36/36) in DWI, 89% (17/19) in PET-CT and 82% (27/33) in CT. Detection rate of DWI was significantly higher than that of CT (p=0.0244) but not significantly higher than that of PET-CT (p=0.22). When the optimal cutoff value of the apparent diffusion coefficient value was set as $1.70{\times}10^{-3}mm^2/sec$, the sensitivity of DWI for diagnosing recurrence or metastasis of lung cancer was 95.6%. Conclusions: DWI is useful for detection of recurrence and metastasis of lung cancer.

Keywords

Lung cancer;recurrence;metastasis;diagnosis;magnetic resonance imaging;diffusion-weighted imaging

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology

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