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Identification of proteins involved in the pancreatic exocrine by exogenous ghrelin administration in Sprague-Dawley rats

  • Lee, Kyung-Hoon (Department of Animal Science and Technology, College of Animal Bioscience & Technology, Konkuk University) ;
  • Wang, Tao (Department of Animal Science and Technology, College of Animal Bioscience & Technology, Konkuk University) ;
  • Jin, Yong-Cheng (Department of Animal Science, College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Jilin University) ;
  • Lee, Sang-Bum (Department of Animal Science and Technology, College of Animal Bioscience & Technology, Konkuk University) ;
  • Oh, Jin-Ju (Department of Animal Science and Technology, College of Animal Bioscience & Technology, Konkuk University) ;
  • Hwang, Jin-Hee (Department of Animal Science and Technology, College of Animal Bioscience & Technology, Konkuk University) ;
  • Lim, Ji-Na (Department of Animal Science and Technology, College of Animal Bioscience & Technology, Konkuk University) ;
  • Lee, Jae-Sung (Department of Animal Science and Technology, College of Animal Bioscience & Technology, Konkuk University) ;
  • Lee, Hong-Gu (Department of Animal Science and Technology, College of Animal Bioscience & Technology, Konkuk University)
  • Received : 2014.04.25
  • Accepted : 2014.05.07
  • Published : 2014.06.05

Abstract

The aims of study were to investigate the effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) infusion of ghrelin on pancreatic ${\alpha}$-amylase outputs and the responses of pancreatic proteins to ghrelin that may relate to the pancreatic exocrine. Six male Sprague-Dawley rats (300 g) were randomly divided into two groups, a control group (C, n = 3) and a treatment group (T, $10.0{\mu}g/kg$ BW, n = 3). Blood samples were collected from rat caudal vein once time after one hour injection. The concentrations of plasma ghrelin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and alfa-amylase activity were evaluated by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kit. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis was conducted to separate the proteins in pancreas tissue. Results showed that the i.p. infusion of ghrelin at doses of $10.0{\mu}g/kg$ body weight (BW) increased the plasma ghrelin concentrations (p = 0.07) and elevated the plasma CCK level significantly (p < 0.05). Although there was no statistically significant, the ${\alpha}$-amylase activity tended to increase. The proteomics analysis indicated that some pancreatic proteins with various functions were up- or down-regulated compared with control group. In conclusion, ghrelin may have role in the pancreatic exocrine, but the signaling pathway was still not clear. Therefore, much more functional studies focus on these found proteins are needed in the near future.

Keywords

Alfa-amylase activity;Cholecystokinin;Ghrelin;Pancreatic exocrine;Sprague-Dawley rats;Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs

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