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Clinicopathological Correlation of Cervical Carcinoma: A Tertiary Hospital Based Study

  • Shruthi, Pannayanapalya Suresh (Department of Pathology and Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research) ;
  • Kalyani, Raju (Department of Pathology and Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research) ;
  • Lee, Jun Kai (Department of Pathology and Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research) ;
  • Narayanaswamy, Mariyappa (Department of Pathology and Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research)
  • Published : 2014.02.28

Abstract

Background: To study the clinical presentation of cervical carcinoma correlating with histopathological findings in a tertiary hospital situated in the southern part of India catering to rural and semi-urban populations Materials and Methods: 199 cases histopathologically diagnosed as cervical cancer over a period of one year were considered for the study. Clinical details of the patients were noted with the help of semi-structured proforma. The data was analysed by descriptive analysis using SPSS software. Results: Out of 199 patients, 109 had moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, 51 poorly differentiated and 35 well differentiated. Adenocarcinomas numbered only four. 121 cases were in the age group of 40-59 years, 59 in 60-80 years and 19 in 20-39 years. All four cases of adenocarcinoma were seen between 40-59 years. 95 (47.7%) cases were in women who had 4 or more children, 120 presented with white discharge, 89 with bleeding per vagina and 68 had constitutional symptoms. Most of the patients with adenocarcinoma presented with bleeding per vagina. 151 was in stage IIIB, 29 in stage IIB, 14 in stage IVA and 5 in stage IB. Conclusions: Screening of cervical cancer should be emphasised in women with white discharge especially in rural areas for early detection of dysplastic cells and reduce mortality and morbidity in productive age. In addition health education has to be given to women regarding the awareness of hygiene, risk factors and symptoms of cervical cancer.

Keywords

Carcinoma cervix;clinicopathological correlation;Karnataka;India

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