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Hematologic Toxicity in Patients Undergoing Radical Anti-cancer Therapy: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Patients in an Oncology Ward in India

  • Roy, Soumyajit (Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Mallick, Supriya (Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Raza, Md. Waseem (Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Haresh, Kunhi Parambath (Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Gupta, Subhash (Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Sharma, Daya Nand (Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Julka, Pramod Kumar (Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Rath, Goura Kisore (Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences)
  • Published : 2014.04.30

Abstract

Burden of cancer is progressively increasing in developing countries like India which has also led to a steep rise in toxicity due to anti-cancer therapy. A cross-sectional analysis was here conducted for patients with different malignancies (except leukaemia) who while undergoing radical anti-cancer therapy were admitted to our oncology ward from January-July 2013. In a total of 280 patients, the total number of toxicity events was 473. Nine patients expired over this time period. Among the events, grade 2 anaemia the most common (n=189) while the most common grades of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were grade 4 (n=114) and grade 2 (n=48), respectively. Among the tracable microbial etiologies, gram negative bacteria were the most commonly found pathogens. Treatment interruptions took place in 240 patients (median duration=8.8 days). Prolonged hospital admission, intensive care and artificial ventilation support was needed to be given in 48, 7 and 13 patients respectively. Advanced NSCLC, KPS <70, pancytopenia and artificial ventilation requirement were found to have a significant impact on death. Such studies show the prevailing practice from institutes of our country and may guide us formulating a guideline for managing such toxicities for this part of the world.

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