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Effectiveness of Cervical Cancer Screening Based on a Mathematical Screening Model using data from the Hiroshima Prefecture Cancer Registry

  • Ito, Katsura (Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences) ;
  • Tsunematsu, Miwako (Department of Health Informatics, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences) ;
  • Satoh, Kenichi (Department of Environmetrics and Biometrics, Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University) ;
  • Kakehashi, Masayuki (Department of Health Informatics, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences) ;
  • Nagata, Yasushi (Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences)
  • Published : 2013.08.30

Abstract

Here we assessed the effectiveness of cervical cancer screening using data from the Hiroshima Prefecture Cancer Registry regarding patient age at the start of screening and differences in screening intervals. A screening model was created to calculate the health status in relation to prognosis following cervical cancer screening and its influence on life expectancy. Epidemiological data on the mortality rate of cervical cancer by age groups and mortality rates from the Hiroshima Prefecture Cancer Registry were used for the model projections. Our results showed that life expectancy when screening rate was 100% compared with 0% was extended by approximately 1 month. Furthermore, when the incidence of cervical cancer was 0% compared with the screening rate was 100%, life expectancy was extended by a maximum of 3 months. Moreover, among individuals affected by cervical c ancer, a difference of 13 years in life expectancy was calculated between screened and unscreened groups.

Keywords

Cancer registry;cervical cancer;mathematical screening model

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