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Significance of Blood Group and Social Factors in Carcinoma Cervix in a Semi-Urban Population in India

  • Lee, Jun Kai (Department of Pathology and Obstretics and Gynecology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research) ;
  • Raju, Kalyani (Department of Pathology and Obstretics and Gynecology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research) ;
  • Lingaiah, Harendra Kumar Malligere (Department of Pathology and Obstretics and Gynecology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research) ;
  • Mariyappa, Narayanaswamy (Department of Pathology and Obstretics and Gynecology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research)
  • Published : 2013.08.30

Abstract

Background: To assess the significance of social factors as risk factors for carcinoma cervix and to determine the significance of blood group to prevalence of carcinoma cervix in a semi-urban population of Kolar, Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: One hundred cases of carcinoma cervix were included in the study, along with 200 females of the same ages considered as controls. Case details were collected from the hospital record section regarding social factors and blood groups and the data were analyzed by descriptive statistical methods. Results: Blood group B showed the highest number of cases (55 cases) followed by blood group O (29 cases) in carcinoma cervix which was statistically significant (p<0.001). Age of marriage between 11 to 20 years showed highest number of carcinoma cervix cases (77 cases) and this also was statistically significant (p<0.001). Patients with rural background were 75 (p=0.112, odds ratio: 1.54), parity of more than or equal to two constituted 96 cases (p=0.006, odds ratio: 4.07) and Hindu patients were 95 in number (p=0.220, odds ratio: 1.89). Conclusions: Blood group B and age of marriage between 11 and 20 years were significantly associated with carcinoma cervix in our population. Region of residence, parity and religion presented with a altered risk for carcinoma cervix.

Keywords

Carcinoma cervix;blood group;social factors;Karnataka

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