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Evaluation of Human Papillomavirus Infections in Prostatic Disease: a Cross-Sectional Study in Iran

  • Ghasemian, Ehsan (Department of Microbiology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University) ;
  • Monavari, Seyed Hamid Reza (Department of Virology, Faculty of Medicine and Antimicrobial Resistance Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Irajian, Gholam Reza (Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Shahed University) ;
  • Nodoshan, Mohammad Reza Jalali (Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shahed University) ;
  • Roudsari, Rouhollah Vahabpour (Department of Virology, Faculty of Medicine and Antimicrobial Resistance Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences) ;
  • Yahyapour, Yousef (Department of Virology, Faculty of Medicine and Antimicrobial Resistance Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences)
  • Published : 2013.05.30

Abstract

Background: The role of inflammation in prostate diseases is suggested by the presence of inflammatory cells within the prostate in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa) patients. In addition, bacterial and viral infection may lead to chronic and recurrent inflammation of the prostate. The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a family of sexually transmitted viruses which have been implicated in the aetiology of cervical cancer and several other malignancies. This study evaluated the frequency of HPV infection in individuals with prostatic disease in Iran. Materials and Methods: The study included formalin fixed paraffin- embedded tissue samples of 196 primary prostate cases, including 29 PCa and 167 BPH samples. HPV DNA was purified and amplified through MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6+ primers with nested PCR. All patients were interviewed using a questionnaire to collect demographic information. Results: Nested PCR showed that HPV DNA was found in 17.2 percent of PCa samples and 4.8 percent of BPH samples (not significant). Conclusions: Our data do not support a significant role of HPV infection in prostatic disease in Iranian patients, but demographic data indicated a probable association between presence of HPV DNA and risk of inflammation in prostate tissue which might lead to prostate carcinoma. Further studies are required to elucidate any roles of HPV infection in prostatic disease.

Keywords

Human papillomavirus;prostate carcinoma;benign prostatic hyperplasia;Iran

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