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Post-diagnosis Soy Food Intake and Breast Cancer Survival: A Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies

  • Chi, Feng (Department of Medical Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University) ;
  • Wu, Rong (Department of Medical Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University) ;
  • Zeng, Yue-Can (Department of Medical Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University) ;
  • Xing, Rui (Department of Medical Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University) ;
  • Liu, Yang (Department of Medical Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University) ;
  • Xu, Zhao-Guo (Department of Medical Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University)
  • Published : 2013.04.30

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Data on associations between soy food intake after cancer diagnosis with breast cancer survival are conflicting, so we conducted this meta-analysis for more accurate evaluation. Methods: Comprehensive searches were conducted to find cohort studies of the relationship between soy food intake after cancer diagnosis and breast cancer survival. Data were analyzed with comprehensive meta-analysis software. Results: Five cohort studies (11,206 patients) were included. Pooling all comparisons, soy food intake after diagnosis was associated with reduced mortality (HR 0.85, 95%CI 0.77 0.93) and recurrence (HR 0.79, 95%CI 0.72 0.87). Pooling the comparisons of highest vs. lowest dose, soy food intake after diagnosis was again associated with reduced mortality (HR 0.84, 95%CI 0.71 0.99) and recurrence (HR 0.74, 95%CI 0.64 0.85). Subgroup analysis of ER status showed that soy food intake was associated with reduced mortality in both ER negative (highest vs. lowest: HR 0.75, 95%CI 0.64 0.88) and ER positive patients (highest vs. lowest: HR 0.72, 95%CI 0.61 0.84), and both premenopausal (highest vs. lowest: HR 0.78, 95%CI 0.69 0.88) and postmenopausal patients (highest vs. lowest: HR 0.81, 95%CI 0.73 0.91). In additioin, soy food intake was associated with reduced recurrence in ER negative (highest vs. lowest: HR 0.64, 95%CI 0.44 0.94) and ER+/PR+ (highest vs. lowest: HR 0.65, 95%CI 0.49 0.86), and postmenopausal patients (highest vs. lowest: HR 0.67, 95%CI 0.56 0.80). Conclusion: Our meta-analysis showed that soy food intake might be associated with better survival, especially for ER negative, ER+/PR+, and postmenopausal patients.

Keywords

Soy foods;breast neoplasms;survival;meta-analysis;receptor status;postmenopausal

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