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Ovarian Transposition for Stage Ib Squamous Cell Cervical Cancer - Lack of Effects on Survival Rates?

  • Turan, A. Taner (Etlik Zubeyde Hanim Women's Health Education and Research Hospital, Division of Gynecological Oncology) ;
  • Keskin, H. Levent (Ankara Ataturk Education Research Hospital, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics) ;
  • Dundar, Betul (Etlik Zubeyde Hanim Women's Health Education and Research Hospital, Division of Gynecological Oncology) ;
  • Gundogdu, Burcu (Etlik Zubeyde Hanim Women's Health Education and Research Hospital, Division of Gynecological Oncology) ;
  • Ozgul, Nejat (Etlik Zubeyde Hanim Women's Health Education and Research Hospital, Division of Gynecological Oncology) ;
  • Boran, Nurettin (Etlik Zubeyde Hanim Women's Health Education and Research Hospital, Division of Gynecological Oncology) ;
  • Tulunay, Gokhan (Etlik Zubeyde Hanim Women's Health Education and Research Hospital, Division of Gynecological Oncology) ;
  • Kose, M. Faruk (Etlik Zubeyde Hanim Women's Health Education and Research Hospital, Division of Gynecological Oncology)
  • Published : 2013.01.31

Abstract

Background: To investigate the impact of ovarian transposition (OT) on survival rates of the patients with stage Ib squamous cell cervical cancer. Materials and Methods: Ninety-two subjects who underwent a radical hysterectomy including oophorectomy were evaluated. For nineteen (20.7%), OT was performed. Patients were divided into two groups, OT versus oophorectomy alone. The primary end-point of this study was to investigate the impact of OT on tumor recurrence rate and time, 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). These comparisons were performed for subgroups including patients who received radiotherapy versus who did not. Statistical analyses were conducted using the Chi-square test, T-test and Mann-Whitney test. OS was examined using the Kaplan-Meier method. $P{\leq}0.05$ was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The median follow-up period was 89 months for OT and 81 months for the oophorectomy group (p>0.05). Both groups experienced similar recurrence rates (31.6% vs. 26.4%, p=0.181). The median duration from surgery to recurrence, and surgery to death were also similar between the groups (p>0.05). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were both 68.4% for the OT group, and 73.6% and 77.8% for the oophorectomy group (p=0.457 and p=0.307, respectively). While the 5-year DFS rate was not statistically significant between the OT and oophorectomy groups who did not receive radiotherapy (p=0.148), the 5-year OS rate was significantly higher in the oophorectomy group (95.4% vs 66.7%, respectively) without radiotherapy (p=0.05). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were statistically similar between the groups who received adjuvant radiotherapy (p>0.05). Conclusions: Ovarian transposition has not significantly negative effect on the survival rates when adjuvant radiotherapy will be applied, while 5-year OS may be less in OT group if radiotherapy is not mandatory.

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