Synthesis and Lubricating Properties of Dimer Acid Derivatives Based on Used Vegetable Oil

폐식물유 기반 다이머산 유도체의 합성 및 경유의 윤활성능

  • Lee, Sang Jun (Division of Convergence Chemistry, Industrial Bio-based Materials Research Group, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology) ;
  • Kim, Young-Wun (Division of Convergence Chemistry, Industrial Bio-based Materials Research Group, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology) ;
  • Yoo, Seung-Hyun (Division of Convergence Chemistry, Industrial Bio-based Materials Research Group, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology) ;
  • Kim, Nam-Kyun (Division of Convergence Chemistry, Industrial Bio-based Materials Research Group, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology) ;
  • Shin, Ji Hoon (Division of Convergence Chemistry, Industrial Bio-based Materials Research Group, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology) ;
  • Yoon, Byung-Tae (Division of Convergence Chemistry, Industrial Bio-based Materials Research Group, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology)
  • 이상준 (한국화학연구원 융합화학연구본부 산업바이오화학연구그룹) ;
  • 김영운 (한국화학연구원 융합화학연구본부 산업바이오화학연구그룹) ;
  • 유승현 (한국화학연구원 융합화학연구본부 산업바이오화학연구그룹) ;
  • 김남균 (한국화학연구원 융합화학연구본부 산업바이오화학연구그룹) ;
  • 신지훈 (한국화학연구원 융합화학연구본부 산업바이오화학연구그룹) ;
  • 윤병태 (한국화학연구원 융합화학연구본부 산업바이오화학연구그룹)
  • Published : 2013.10.31

Abstract

Vegetable oil-based dimer acid derivatives were prepared through a two-step procedure and their lubricating properties for diesel fuel were evaluated using high frequency reciprocating ring (HFRR) method to investigate wear scar diameter (WSD). Diels-Alder reaction at an elevated temperature transformed fatty acid to dimer acid, subsequently converted into dimer acid derivatives by esterification with methanol. It should be noted that the derivatives were dissolved well in diesel oil up to 1 wt%. After adding 120 ppm of the derivatives to pure diesel, the WSD significantly decreased to $300{\sim}05{\mu}m$, compared to $552{\mu}m$ of WSD in pure diesel. Dimer acid derivatives having carboxylic acid show superb in lubricating property which does not depend on the alkyl group in the derivatives.

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