Investigation on CO Adsorption and Catalytic Oxidation of Commercial Impregnated Activated Carbons

상용 첨착활성탄의 일산화탄소 흡착성능 및 촉매산화반응 연구

  • Ko, Sangwon (Eco-Transport Research Division, Korea Railroad Research Institute) ;
  • Kim, Dae Han (Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University) ;
  • Kim, Young Dok (Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University) ;
  • Park, Duckshin (Eco-Transport Research Division, Korea Railroad Research Institute) ;
  • Jeong, Wootae (Eco-Transport Research Division, Korea Railroad Research Institute) ;
  • Lee, Duck Hee (Eco-Transport Research Division, Korea Railroad Research Institute) ;
  • Lee, Jae-Young (Eco-Transport Research Division, Korea Railroad Research Institute) ;
  • Kwon, Soon-Bark (Eco-Transport Research Division, Korea Railroad Research Institute)
  • 고상원 (한국철도기술연구원 에코시스템연구실) ;
  • 김대한 (성균관대학교 화학과) ;
  • 김영독 (성균관대학교 화학과) ;
  • 박덕신 (한국철도기술연구원 에코시스템연구실) ;
  • 정우태 (한국철도기술연구원 에코시스템연구실) ;
  • 이덕희 (한국철도기술연구원 에코시스템연구실) ;
  • 이재영 (한국철도기술연구원 에코시스템연구실) ;
  • 권순박 (한국철도기술연구원 에코시스템연구실)
  • Published : 2013.10.31

Abstract

We investigated the properties of impregnated activated carbons, a commercial adsorbent for the individual protection equipment, and examined CO adsorption and oxidation to $CO_2$. The surface area, pore volume and pore size were measured for four commercial samples using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller/Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BET/BJH), and atomic compositions of the sample surface were analyzed based on SEM/EDS and XPS. Impregnated activated carbons containing Mn and Cu for fire showed the catalytic CO oxidation to $CO_2$ with a high catalytic activity (up to 99% $CO_2$ yield), followed by the CO adsorption at an initial reaction time. On the other hand, C: for chemical biologial and radiological (CBR) samples, not including Mn, showed a lower CO conversion to $CO_2$ (up to 60% yield) compared to that of fire samples. It was also found that a heat-treated activated carbon has a higher removal capacity both for CO and $CO_2$ at room temperature than that of untreated carbon, which was probably due to the impurity removal in pores resulted in a detection-delay about 30 min.

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