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Risk Factors for Cervical Cancer in Rural Areas of Wuhan China: a Matched Case-control Study

  • Zhang, Bin (Wuhan Women and Children's Medical Center Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Zhou, Ai-Fen (Wuhan Women and Children's Medical Center Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Zhu, Chang-Cai (School of Public Health, Medical College, Wuhan University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Zhang, Ling (School of Public Health, Medical College, Wuhan University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Xiang, Bing (School of Public Health, Medical College, Wuhan University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Chen, Zhong (Wuhan Women and Children's Medical Center Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Hu, Rong-Hua (Wuhan Women and Children's Medical Center Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Zhang, Ya-Qi (Wuhan Women and Children's Medical Center Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Qiu, Lin (Wuhan Women and Children's Medical Center Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Zhang, Yi-Ming (Wuhan Women and Children's Medical Center Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Xiong, Chao-Du (Wuhan Women and Children's Medical Center Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Du, Yu-Kai (School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Shi, Yu-Qin (School of Public Health, Medical College, Wuhan University of Science and Technology)
  • Published : 2013.12.31

Abstract

Cervical cancer is a serious public health problem in developing countries. We investigated possible risk factors for cervical cancer in rural areas of Wuhan China using a matched case-control study with 33 women diagnosed with cervical cancer and 132 healthy women selected from the same area as matched controls. A questionnaire, which included questions about general demography conditions, environmental and genetic factors, the first sexual intercourse, first marriage age, age at first pregnancy, pregnancy first child's age, female personal health history, social psychological factors, dietary habits, smoking and alcohol status and other living habits was presented to all participants. At the same time, HPV infection of every participant was examined in laboratory testing. Results showed HPV infection (P<0.000, OR=23.4) and pregnancy first child's age (P<0.000, OR=13.1) to be risk factors for cervical cancer. Menopause (P=0.003, OR=0.073) was a protective factor against cervical cancer. However, there was no indication of associations of environmental (drinking water, insecticide, disinfectant) genetic (cancer family history), or life-style factors (smoking status, alcohol status, physical training, sleep quality), including dietary habits (intake of fruit and vegetable, meat, fried food, bean products and pickled food) or social psychological factors with cervical cancer. The results suggest that the risk of cervical cancer in Chinese rural women may be associated with HPV infection, menopause and the pregnancy first child's age.

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