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Survival of Cholangiocarcinoma Patients in Northeastern Thailand after Supportive Treatment

  • Thunyaharn, Nut (Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University) ;
  • Promthet, Supannee (Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University) ;
  • Wiangnon, Surapon (Department of Pediatrics, Khon Kaen University) ;
  • Suwanrungruang, Krittika (Cancer Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University) ;
  • Kamsa-ard, Supot (Cancer Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University)
  • Published : 2013.11.30

Abstract

Background: Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a very common cancer in Northeastern Thailand. Most CCA patients see a physician at a late stage when curative surgery is not possible. After diagnosis, they generally are treated by partial surgery/percutaneous drainage, chemotherapy and supportive treatment. Objective: This study aimed to assess the survival rates of CCA patients after supportive treatment. Methods: A retrospective cohort design was applied in this study. Data for 746 CCA patients were extracted from the hospital-based cancer registry of Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen University. The patients were diagnosed (at least by ultrasonography) between 1 January, 2009 and 31 December, 2009 and then followed up for current status until 30 June, 2011. The cumulative survival rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and independent prognostic factors were investigated using Cox regression. Results: The total follow-up time was 5,878 person-months, and the total number of deaths was 637. The mortality rate was therefore 10.8 per 100 person-year (95%CI : 10.1-11.7). The cumulative 3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 month survival rates were 59%, 39%, 31%, 24% and 14%, respectively. The median survival time after supportive treatment was 4 months. After adjusting for gender, age, stage, distant metastasis, histological grading and treatment, stage was a significant predictor of survival of CCA patients. Those in stage III and stage IV had a 6.78 fold higher mortality than the stage I and stage II cases (95% CI : 1.6-28.7). Conclusion: It is very important to encourage patients to see health personnel at an early stage.

Keywords

Cholangiocarcinoma;supportive treatment;survival time;North-East Thailand

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