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Association of DNA Base-excision Repair XRCC1, OGG1 and APE1 Gene Polymorphisms with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Susceptibility in a Chinese Population

  • Li, Qing (Cancer Center, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University) ;
  • Wang, Jian-Min (The 6th Department of Research Institute of Surgery, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University) ;
  • Peng, Yu (Cancer Center, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University) ;
  • Zhang, Shi-Heng (Cancer Center, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University) ;
  • Ren, Tao (Cancer Center, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University) ;
  • Luo, Hao (Cancer Center, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University) ;
  • Cheng, Yi (Cancer Center, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University) ;
  • Wang, Dong (Cancer Center, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University)
  • Published : 2013.09.30

Abstract

Background: Numerous carcinogens and reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause DNA damage including oxidative base lesions that lead to risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Genetic susceptibility has been reported to play a key role in the development of this disease. The base excision repair (BER) pathway can effectively remove oxidative lesions, maintaining genomic stability and normal expression, with X-ray repair crosscomplementing1 (XRCC1), 8-oxoguanine glycosylase-1 (OGG1) and apurinic/apyimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) playing important roles. Aims: To analyze polymorphisms of DNA BER genes (OOG1, XRCC1 and APE1) and explore their associations, and the combined effects of these variants, with risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Materials and Methods: We detected SNPs of XRCC1 (Arg399Gln), OGG1 (Ser326Cys), APE1 (Asp148Glu and -141T/G) using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with peripheral blood samples from 231 patients with NPC and 300 healthy people, furtherly analyzing their relations with the risk of NPC in multivariate logistic regression models. Results: After adjustment for sex and age, individuals with the XRCC1 399Gln/Gln (OR=1.96; 95%CI:1.02-3.78; p=0.04) and Arg/Gln (OR=1.87; 95%CI:1.29-2.71; p=0.001) genotype variants demonstrated a significantly increased risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma compared with those having the wild-type Arg/Arg genotype. APE1-141G/G was associated with a significantly reduced risk of NPC (OR=0.40;95%CI:0.18-0.89) in the smoking group. The OR calculated for the combination of XRCC1 399Gln and APE1 148Gln, two homozygous variants, was significantly additive for all cases (OR=2.09; 95% CI: 1.27-3.47; p=0.004). Conclusion: This is the first study to focus on the association between DNA base-excision repair genes (XRCC1, OGG1 and APE1) polymorphism and NPC risk. The XRCC1 Arg399Gln variant genotype is associated with an increased risk of NPC. APE1-141G/G may decrease risk of NPC in current smokers. The combined effects of polymorphisms within BER genes of XRCC1 399Gln and APE1 148Gln may contribute to a high risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

Keywords

Base excision repair;single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP);nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC)

Acknowledgement

Supported by : National Natural Science Foundation of China

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