Decomposition of Ethylene by Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

유전체 배리어 방전 플라즈마를 이용한 에틸렌의 분해

  • Jang, Doo Il (Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Jeju National University) ;
  • Lim, Tae Hun (Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Jeju National University) ;
  • Lee, Sang Baek (Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Jeju National University) ;
  • Mok, Young Sun (Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Jeju National University) ;
  • Park, Hoeman (Rural Development Administration, National Academy of Agricultural Science)
  • 장두일 (제주대학교 생명화학공학과) ;
  • 임태헌 (제주대학교 생명화학공학과) ;
  • 이상백 (제주대학교 생명화학공학과) ;
  • 목영선 (제주대학교 생명화학공학과) ;
  • 박회만 (농촌진흥청 국립농업과학원)
  • Published : 2012.12.10

Abstract

Dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor was applied to the removal of ethylene from a simulated storage facility ($1.0m^3$) of fruits and vegetables. The system operated in a closed-loop mode by feeding the contaminated gas to the plasma reactor and recirculating the treated gas back to the storage facility. The experiments were carried out with parameters such as discharge power, circulation flow rate, initial ethylene concentration and treatment time. The rate of ethylene decomposition was mainly controlled by the discharge power and the treatment time. With the other conditions kept constant, the ethylene decomposition rate in the presence of the manganese oxide ozone control catalyst installed downstream from the plasma reactor was lower than that in the absence of it. The suggests that unreacted ozone from the plasma reactor accumulated in the storage facility where it additionally decomposed ethylene. On the basis of an initial ethylene concentration of 50 ppm, the energy requirement for completing the decomposition was about 60 kJ.

Keywords

dielectric barrier discharge plasma;ethylene removal;ozone

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