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Clinico-Pathological Significance of MHC-I Type Chain-associated Protein A Expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  • Wang, Jie (Department of Immunology, Xiangya Medical School, Central South University) ;
  • Li, Chao (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Xiang Ya Hospital, Central South University) ;
  • Yang, Dan (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Xiang Ya Hospital, Central South University) ;
  • Jian, Xin-Chun (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Xiang Ya Hospital, Central South University) ;
  • Jiang, Can-Hua (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Xiang Ya Hospital, Central South University)
  • Published : 2012.02.29

Abstract

The current research concerns the clinicopathological significance of MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA) expression in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). The expression and location of MICA protein in 14 normal oral mucous and 45 cancerous and para-cancerous tissues were assessed by immunohistochemistry and levels of MICA mRNA expression in 29 cancerous and para-cancerous tissues were determined by the real-time polymerase chain reaction. Data were analyzed with the SPSS16.0 software package. MICA was found to be located in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. Expression was higher in para-cancerous than in cancerous tissues (P < 0.05). However, no statistical difference was found between the following: 1) para-cancerous tissue with normal mucosa; 2) normal mucosa with cancerous tissue;and 3) among different clinicopathological parameters in OSCC (P > 0.05). The level of MICA mRNA was higher in OSCCs than in para-cancerous tissues, and was correlated with the regional lymph node status and disease stage (P < 0.05). The levels of MICA protein and mRNA expression differ among normal oral mucosa, para-cancerous tissue, and cancerous tissue. MICA may contribute to the tumorigenesis and progression of OSCC.

Keywords

Carcinoma squamous cell;MHC class I-related chain A;immunohistochemistry;polymerase chain reaction

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Natural Science Foundation of China

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