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Predictors of Quitting Tobacco - Results of a Worksite Tobacco Cessation Service Program Among Factory Workers in Mumbai, india

  • Pimple, Sharmila (Department of Preventive Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital) ;
  • Pednekar, Mangesh (Healis, Sekhsaria Institute for Public Health) ;
  • Mazumdar, Parishi (Department of Preventive Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital) ;
  • Goswami, Savita (Psychiatric Unit, Tata Memorial Hospital) ;
  • Shastri, Surendra (Department of Preventive Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital)
  • Published : 2012.02.29

Abstract

Background: Tobacco cessation would provide the most immediate benefits of tobacco control to prevent tobacco related disease morbidity and mortality. Methods: A tobacco cessation program involving individual and group behavior therapy was implemented in three stages at a worksite. Tobacco quit rates were assessed at the end of each contact session. Results: Out of the 291 tobacco users identified, 224 participated in the tobacco cessation interventions. At the end of three interventions, 38 (17%) users had successfully quit tobacco use. Presence of clinical oral pre-cancer lesion was found to be associated with quitting (p=0.02). Also tobacco users with oral pre-cancer lesions were around three times more likely to quit than those with no lesions (OR= 2.70 95% C.I= 1.20 - 6.05). Conclusion: Cost effective multi-pronged tobacco cessation approaches, inbuilt into other occupational health and welfare activities, are acceptable and feasible to achieve long term sustainable tobacco cessation programs at worksites.

Keywords

Tobacco cessation;individual counseling;group behavior therapy;India

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