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Predictive Value of Xrcc1 Gene Polymorphisms for Side Effects in Patients undergoing Whole Breast Radiotherapy: a Meta-analysis

  • Xie, Xiao-Xue (Department of Radiation and Oncology, Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital and Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xiangya Medical School, Central South University) ;
  • Ouyang, Shu-Yu (Department of Radiation and Oncology, Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital and Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xiangya Medical School, Central South University) ;
  • Jin, He-Kun (Department of Radiation and Oncology, Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital and Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xiangya Medical School, Central South University) ;
  • Wang, Hui (Department of Radiation and Oncology, Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital and Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xiangya Medical School, Central South University) ;
  • Zhou, Ju-Mei (Department of Radiation and Oncology, Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital and Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xiangya Medical School, Central South University) ;
  • Hu, Bing-Qiang (Department of Radiation and Oncology, Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital and Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xiangya Medical School, Central South University)
  • Published : 2012.12.31

Abstract

Radiation-induced side effects on normal tissue are determined largely by the capacity of cells to repair radiation-induced DNA damage. X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) plays an important role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks. Studies have shown conflicting results regarding the association between XRCC1 gene polymorphisms (Arg399Gln, Arg194Trp, -77T>C and Arg280His) and radiation-induced side effects in patients undergoing whole breast radiotherapy. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to determine the predictive value of XRCC1 gene polymorphisms in this regard. Analysis of the 11 eligible studies comprising 2,199 cases showed that carriers of the XRCC1 399 Gln allele had a higher risk of radiation-induced toxicity than those with the 399 ArgArg genotype in studies based on high-quality genotyping methods [Gln vs. ArgArg: OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.20-2.86] or in studies with mixed treatment regimens of radiotherapy alone and in combination with chemotherapy [Gln vs. ArgArg: OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.09-2.23]. The XRCC1 Arg399Gln variant allele was associated with mixed acute and late adverse reactions when studies on late toxicity only were excluded [Gln allele vs. Arg allele: OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.00-1.49]. In contrast, the XRCC1 Arg280His variant allele was protective against radiation-induced toxicity in studies including patients treated by radiotherapy alone [His allele vs. Arg allele: OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.96]. Our results suggest that XRCC1 399Gln and XRCC1 280Arg may be independent predictors of radiation-induced toxicity in post-surgical breast cancer patients, and the selection of genotyping method is an important factor in determining risk factors. No evidence for any predictive value of XRCC1 Arg194Trp and XRCC1 -77T>C was found. So, larger and well-designed studies might be required to further evaluate the predictive value of XRCC1 gene variation on radiation-induced side effects in patients undergoing whole breast radiotherapy.

Keywords

XRCC1;single nucleotide polymorphisms;whole breast radiotherapy;side effect;meta-analysis

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Science Foundation for Post Doctorate Research

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