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Characterization of the Physical Form of Allergenic Cry j 1 in the Urban Atmosphere and Determination of Cry j 1 Denaturation by Air Pollutants

  • Wang, Qingyue (Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University) ;
  • Morita, Jun (Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University) ;
  • Gong, Xiumin (Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University) ;
  • Nakamura, Shinichi (Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University) ;
  • Suzuki, Miho (Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University) ;
  • Lu, Senlin (School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University) ;
  • Sekiguchi, Kazuhiko (Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University) ;
  • Nakajima, Takuya (Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University) ;
  • Nakajima, Daisuke (Research Center for Environmental Risk, National institute for Environmental Studies) ;
  • Miwa, Makoto (Center for Environmental Science in Saitama)
  • Received : 2011.08.23
  • Accepted : 2011.11.04
  • Published : 2012.03.31

Abstract

In this study, we characterized the physical form of allergenic Cry j 1 in the urban atmosphere. Through an immunofluorescence antibody method, we showed that allergenic Cry j 1 exists as fine particles (${\leq}1.1{\mu}m$). To determine Cry j 1 concentrations and its particle size distribution, we used the ELISA method to confirm that most Cry j 1 exists as fine particles in the urban atmosphere and is found at high concentrations on fine day next to rainy day. Furthermore, we evaluated Cry j 1 denaturation by using the Biacore J system based on the surface plasmon resonence (SPR) principle and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). We showed that the dissociation constant ($K_D$) of Cry j 1 that has been exposed to urban polluted air is lower ($1.76{\times}10^{-14}$ M) than that of Cry j 1 ($1.32{\times}10^{-9}-3.37{\times}10^{-9}$ M) of original pollen grains that has not been exposed to air pollutants. Cry j 1 turns into low molecular weight proteins by reacting with various acidic solutions. In sum, we showed that allergenic Cry j 1 exists as fine particles that can deposit in the lower respiratory tract. This finding clarifies the relationship between Japanese cedar pollinosis and air pollutants.

Keywords

Japanese cedar pollinosis;Allergenic Cry j 1;Surface plasmon resonance (SPR);Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDSPAGE);Air pollutants

References

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  2. Size distribution of allergenic Cry j 2 released from airborne Cryptomeria japonica pollen grains during the pollen scattering seasons vol.33, pp.1, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10453-016-9450-6