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Variants on ESR1 and their Association with Prostate Cancer Risk: A Meta-analysis

  • Ding, Xiang (Department of Urology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University) ;
  • Cui, Feng-Mei (Department of Toxicology, School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Soochow University) ;
  • Xu, Song-Tao (Department of Urology, the First People's Hospital of Taicang) ;
  • Pu, Jin-Xian (Department of Urology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University) ;
  • Huang, Yu-Hua (Department of Urology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University) ;
  • Zhang, Jiang-Lei (Department of Urology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University) ;
  • Wei, Xue-Dong (Department of Urology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University) ;
  • Hou, Jian-Quan (Department of Urology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University) ;
  • Yan, Chun-Yin (Department of Urology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University)
  • Published : 2012.08.31

Abstract

Background: Epidemiological studies evaluating the association of two variants rs9340799 and rs2234693 on estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) with prostate risk have generated inconsistent results. Methods: A meta-analysis was here conducted to systematically evaluate the relationship of these two variants with prostate cancer susceptibility. Results: For rs9340799, heterozygosity of T/C carriers showed a significant increased prostate cancer risk with a pooled odds ratio (OR) of 1.34 (95% CI = 1.06-1.69) while homozygote C/C carriers showed an increased but not statistically significant association with prostate cancer risk (pooled OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 0.94-1.79). Compared to the homozygous TT carriers, the allele C carriers showed a 31% increased risk for prostate cancer (pooled OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.06-1.63). No significant association between the rs2234693 and prostate cancer risk was found with the pooled OR of 1.15 (95% CI = 0.97-1.39, T/C and C/C vs. T/T) under the dominant genetic model. Compared to the homozygote T/T carriers, the heterozygous T/C carriers did not show any significantly different risk of prostate cancer (pooled OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 0.94-1.36) and the homozygous C/C carriers also did not show a significant change for prostate cancer risk compared to the wide-type T/T carriers (pooled OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 0.98-1.62). Conclusion: These data suggested that variant rs9340799, but not rs2234693, on ESR1 confers an elevated risk of prostate cancer.

Keywords

ESR1;prostate cancer;polymorphisms;meta-analysis

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