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Portion sizes of foods frequently consumed by the Korean elderly: Data from KNHANES IV-2

  • Kim, Sook-Bae (Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Research Institute of Human Ecology, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Kim, Soon-Kyung (Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, Soonchunhyang University) ;
  • Kim, Se-Na (Department of Agrofood Resources, NAAS, RDA) ;
  • Kim, So-Young (Department of Agrofood Resources, NAAS, RDA) ;
  • Cho, Young-Sook (Department of Agrofood Resources, NAAS, RDA) ;
  • Kim, Mi-Hyun (Department of Food and Nutrition, Kangwon National University)
  • Received : 2011.09.27
  • Accepted : 2011.10.31
  • Published : 2011.12.31

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to define a one-portion size of food frequently consumed by the Koreans aged 65 years or over. From the original 8,631 people who took part in the Forth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey(KNHANES IV-2) 2008, we analyzed the data on 1,458 persons (16.9%) aged 65 and over, and selected food items consumed based on the intake frequency of 30 or more by all participant. A total of 158 varieties of food items were selected. The portion size of food items was set on the basis of the median amount (50 percentile) in a single intake by a single person. In the cereals category, 13 items were selected, of which the most frequently consumed item was well-polished rice with portion size of 75 g. Among legumes, 7 items were selected, of which the most frequent item was dried black soybean with a portion size of 6 g. Among the 16 groups, the most varied food group (49 items) was vegetables, and among these the most frequently occurring item was garlic (5 g), while among the fruit group, only 11 items were selected, as their intake frequency was low. Fish and shellfish were more frequently consumed by the elderly than meats. The most frequently consumed meat was pork loin, with a portion size of 30 g. In fish and shellfish, the most frequently consumed item was dried and boiled large anchovy with a portion size of 2 g. Portion sizes for food items consumed regularly by the elderly may be conveniently and effectively used in dietary planning and in nutritional education programs, and in assessing the diet intake status of the elderly.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : National Academy of Agricultural Science of Rural Development Administration

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