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The effects of topography on local wind-induced pressures of a medium-rise building

  • Hitchcock, P.A. (CLP Power Wind/Wave Tunnel Facility, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Kwok, K.C.S. (School of Engineering, University of Western Sydney) ;
  • Wong, K.S. (CLP Power Wind/Wave Tunnel Facility, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) ;
  • Shum, K.M. (CLP Power Wind/Wave Tunnel Facility, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)
  • Received : 2009.06.26
  • Accepted : 2010.03.06
  • Published : 2010.09.25

Abstract

Wind tunnel model tests were conducted for a residential apartment block located within the complex terrain of The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST). The test building is typical of medium-rise residential buildings in Hong Kong. The model study was conducted using modelling techniques and assumptions that are commonly used to predict design wind loads and pressures for buildings sited in regions of significant topography. Results for the building model with and without the surrounding topography were compared to investigate the effects of far-field and near-field topography on wind characteristics at the test building site and wind-induced external pressure coefficients at key locations on the building facade. The study also compared the wind tunnel test results to topographic multipliers and external pressure coefficients determined from nine international design standards. Differences between the external pressure coefficients stipulated in the various standards will be exacerbated when they are combined with the respective topographic multipliers.

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Cited by

  1. Wind direction field under the influence of topography: part II: CFD investigations vol.22, pp.4, 2016, https://doi.org/10.12989/was.2016.22.4.477