Dietary Value of Candida utilis for Artemia Nauplii and Mytilus edulis Larvae

Artemia nauplii와 Mytilus edulis 유생에 대한 Candida utilis의 먹이효율

  • Kim, Hae-Young (Department of Aquaculture, Pukyong National University) ;
  • Kim, Jung-Kyun (Department of Bioengineering, Pukyong National University) ;
  • Hur, Sung-Bum (Department of Aquaculture, Pukyong National University)
  • Published : 2009.02.25

Abstract

Yeast has been widely used as a food organism for mass culture of rotifer and also considered as a partial substitute food for microalga in shellfish culture. But the dietary value of yeast is poorer than that of microalga due to its low nutrition and thick cell wall. This study was carried out to find a nutritious yeast species as a food organism and to investigate the nutritional value of manipulated yeast for shellfish. First of all, three species of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida utilis, Kluyveromyces fragilis) and their manipulated yeast were tested on the survival (%) and growth of Artemia nauplii and Mytilus edulis larvae, which were representative filter feeding animal and easy to control. The survival (%) and growth of Artemia nauplii fed C. utilis were higher than those fed S. cerevisiae or K. fragilis. The growth of Artemia nauplii and M. edulis larvae, which were fed manipulated yeast was higher than that fed non-manipulated one. The manipulated yeast with higher removal rate of cell wall showed better dietary value for Artemia nauplii and M. edulis larvae. M. edulis larvae fed mixed-diet with Isochrysis galbana (50%) and manipulated C. utilis (50%) showed significantly higher growth than those fed single-diet with I. galbana. It means that manipulated C. utilis can substitute I. galbana at least 50% for M. edulis larvae.

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