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Salt Intake Behavior and Blood Pressure: the effect of taste sensitivity and preference

소금 섭취 행태와 혈압: 맛에 대한 민감도와 선호도의 영향

  • Kim, Jin-Hee (Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University) ;
  • Choi, Man-Kyu (Department of Healthcare Management, Korea University)
  • 김진희 (서울대학교 보건대학원) ;
  • 최만규 (고려대학교 보건행정학과)
  • Published : 2007.08.31

Abstract

The literature suggested that a small reduction in overall blood pressure can have a large effect on overall prevalence of hypertension, and therefore, the affect of taste preferences of the population on salt intake should be considered for long-term blood pressure intervention programs. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of salt taste preference and salt taste sensitivity on salt intake behavior as risk factors for high blood pressure. We collected information on blood pressure, diet and lifestyle behaviors, salt taste preference and salt taste sensitivity from 540 respondents from Suseo-dong, Seoul. Salt taste sensitivity was assessed by administering a 1% NaCl solution to the subject's tongue and measuring the perceived intensity on 10 level scale. Salt intake behavior was classified into 3 categories: frequency of high-sodium foods, practice of salt-reducing behavior and frequency of vegetable and fruit intake. Salt taste preference showed a significant relation to the subjects' blood pressure, i.e. subjects with a higher salt preference had higher blood pressure. Salt taste sensitivity did not show a significant relation to blood pressure. However, there was a positive correlation between salt taste preference and salt taste sensitivity. Among the 3 indicators used to measure salt intake behavior, the practice of salt-reducing behavior remained significantly correlated to blood pressure. Moreover, salt-reducing behavior and salt taste preference showed a significant correlation, i.e. people who do not like salty foods tend to practice more salt-reducing behavior, leading to reduced levels in blood pressure. In a population, a small reduction in overall blood pressure can have large effects in overall prevalence of hypertension, in contrast to clinical studies where achievement of an individual's normal blood pressure is emphasized. Therefore, taste preference of the population should be considered for long-term blood pressure intervention programs.

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  3. The Effect of Zinc Status on Salty Taste Acuity, Salty Taste Preference, Sodium Intake and Blood Pressure in Korean Young Adults vol.43, pp.2, 2010, https://doi.org/10.4163/kjn.2010.43.2.132
  4. The Relationship between Dietary Behaviors/health Risk Factors and Preference for Salty Taste among Korean Elderly People Living in Rural Areas vol.19, pp.5, 2014, https://doi.org/10.5720/kjcn.2014.19.5.448
  5. Salt-related Dietary Behaviors of University Students in Gyeongbuk Area vol.43, pp.7, 2014, https://doi.org/10.3746/jkfn.2014.43.7.1122