Studies on the Effect of Silicon Nutrition on Plant Growth, Mineral Contents and Endogenous Bioactive Gibberellins of Three Rice Cultivars

  • Jang, Soo-Won (KT&G Central Research Institute) ;
  • Hamayun, Muhammad (Division of Plant Biosciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Sohn, Eun-Young (Division of Plant Biosciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Shin, Dong-Hyun (Division of Plant Biosciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Kim, Kil-Ung (Division of Plant Biosciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Lee, In-Jung (Division of Plant Biosciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Kyungpook National University)
  • Published : 2007.03.31

Abstract

Silicon is one of the key elements for healthy growth and development in rice crops. We analyzed the effect of silicon(Si) on some growth parameters, plant mineral contents, and bioactive gibberellins in three rice cultivars. Silicon was applied at the rates of 0 kg/0.1ha(control), 40 kg/0.1ha, and 80 kg/0.1ha throughout the course of experiment. Plant growth parameters were enhanced by the application of elevated Si, though plant height and culm length were more favorably affected than the respective dry weights. The plant mineral contents analyzed also increased in treatments where Si was applied without potassium, demonstrating that Si application promotes the absorption of these minerals in rice crops. The endogenous gibberellins measured in our study showed that $GA_1$ is the only bioactive GA form present in rice seedlings. The endogenous $GA_1$ and its precursor $GA_{20}$ contents increased after Si application. However, this increase in endogenous $GA_1$ and $GA_{20}$ contents, and plant growth parameters were different according to the rice cultivars. Our results indicate that Si is a beneficial element in rice nutrition and that different cultivars of Oryza sativa show differential responses to Si nutrition in terms of their growth and development.