Second Order Nonlinear Optical Polyimides Containing Organic Chromophores with an Oxadiazole Segment

옥사디아졸 결합의 유기 발색단이 도입된 이차비선형 광학 이미드 고분자

  • Do, Jung Yun (Department of Advanced Materials for Information and Display and Department of Chemistry Education, Pusan National University) ;
  • Kim, Bong Gun (Department of Advanced Materials for Information and Display and Department of Chemistry Education, Pusan National University) ;
  • Kwon, Ji-Yun (Department of Advanced Materials for Information and Display and Department of Chemistry Education, Pusan National University)
  • 도정윤 (부산대학교 첨단정보 및 디스플레이소재학과) ;
  • 김봉건 (부산대학교 첨단정보 및 디스플레이소재학과) ;
  • 권지윤 (부산대학교 첨단정보 및 디스플레이소재학과)
  • Received : 2006.11.23
  • Accepted : 2006.12.28
  • Published : 2007.02.10

Abstract

It is essential that second order nonlinear optical materials have low optical propagation losses in the wavelengths of second harmonic generation for practical applications in waveguides. Three dipolar chromophores substituted with nitro, cyano, and alkyl sulfone as an electron withdrawing group were prepared. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the cyano and alkylsulfone chromophores showed a blue-shift compared to the nitro chromophore. The introduction of oxadiazole segment in the chromophore structure led to similar spectral shift. The blue-shift can produce low optical loses at second harmonics. The chromophores were successfully attached to a polyimide, yielding side chain polymers. The nonlinear optical property of the prepared optical polymers was determined by measuring electro-optic coefficient at 1.55 mm. The polymers exhibited high glass transition temperature of over $185^{\circ}C$ and thermal stability to $300^{\circ}C$ through differential scanning calorimeter analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : 부산대학교

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