DNA Barcoding Korean Birds

  • Yoo, Hye Sook (Biological Resource Center/Korean BioInformation Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology) ;
  • Eah, Jae-Yong (Biological Resource Center/Korean BioInformation Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology) ;
  • Kim, Jong Soo (Hankuk Academy of Foreign Studies) ;
  • Kim, Young-Jun (Conservation Genome Resource Bank for Korean Wildlife (CGRB), College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University) ;
  • Min, Mi-Sook (Conservation Genome Resource Bank for Korean Wildlife (CGRB), College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University) ;
  • Paek, Woon Kee (Natural History Team, National Science Museum) ;
  • Lee, Hang (Conservation Genome Resource Bank for Korean Wildlife (CGRB), College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University) ;
  • Kim, Chang-Bae (Biological Resource Center/Korean BioInformation Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology)
  • Received : 2006.08.31
  • Accepted : 2006.11.13
  • Published : 2006.12.31

Abstract

DNA barcoding, an inventory of DNA sequences from a standardized genomic region, provides a bio-barcode for identifying and discovering species. Several recent studies suggest that the sequence diversity in a 648 bp region of the mitochondrial gene for cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) might serve as a DNA barcode for identifying animal species such as North American birds, insects and fishes. The present study tested the effectiveness of a COI barcode in discriminating Korean bird species. We determined the 5' terminus of the COI barcode for 92 species of Korean birds and found that species identification was unambiguous; the genetic differences between closely related species were, on average, 25 times higher than the differences within species. We identified only one misidentified species out of 239 specimens in a genetic resource bank, so confirming the accuracy of species identification in the banking system. We also identified two potential composite species, calling for further investigation using more samples. The finding of large COI sequence differences between species confirms the effectiveness of COI barcodes for identifying Korean bird species. To bring greater reliability to the identification of species, increased intra- and interspecies sampling, as well as supplementation of the mitochondrial barcodes with nuclear ones, is needed.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Korea Science and Engineering Foundation (KOSEF)

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