Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase (EC-SOD) Transgenic Mice: Possible Animal Model for Various Skin Changes

  • Kim, Sung-Hyun (School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Kim, Myoung-Ok (School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Lee, Sang-Gyu (School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Ryoo, Zae-Young (School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University)
  • Published : 2006.12.31

Abstract

We have generated transgenic mice that expressed mouse extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) in their skin. In particular, the expression plasmid DNA containing human keratin K14 promoter was used to direct the keratinocyte-specific transcription of the transgene. To compare intron-dependent and intron-independent gene expression, we constructed two vectors. The vector B, which contains the rabbit -globin intron 2, was not effective for mouse EC-SOD overexpression. The EC-SOD transcript was detected in the skin, as determined by Northern blot analysis. Furthermore, EC-SOD protein was detected in the skin tissue, as demonstrated by Western blot analysis. To evaluate the expression levels of EC-SOD in various tissues, we purified EC-SOD from the skin, lungs, brain, kidneys, livers, and spleen of transgenic mice and measured its activities. EC-SOD activities in the transgenic mice skin were approximately 7 fold higher than in wild-type mice. These results suggest that the mouse overexpressing vector not only induces keratinocyte-specific expression of EC-SOD, but also expresses successfully functional EC-SOD. Thus, these transgenic mice appeared to be useful for the expression of the EC-SOD gene and subsequent analysis of various skin changes, such as erythema, inflamation, photoaging, and skin tumors.

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