Gender, Residential Areas, Retirement Transitions, and Psychological Well-Being of the Elderly

은퇴가 심리적 안녕에 미치는 영향에 관한 종단적 연구: 노인의 성과 거주지역을 중심으로

  • Published : 2006.11.30

Abstract

This study examined whether a relationship between retirement transitions and psychological well-being of the elderly may differ by gender and residential areas, and whether associative factors of psychological well-being may vary by gender and residential areas. The sample included 1,124 older adults aged 60 and over, which derived from the first wave and the third wave data of the "Aging and the Quality of Life of the Elderly in Korea: A Longitudinal Study" living in Seoul and Chuncheon. The total sample was divided into four sub-samples(urban male elders, rural male elders, urban female elders, and rural female elders) to answer research questions. Psychological well-being was measured by measured by the PGCMS developed by Lawton, and a retirement variable had four categories: being continuously non-retired, newly retired, newly non-retired, and being continuously retired with a reference group of being continuously non-retired. Multivariate OLS regression was run separately for the four groups. For urban male elders, retirement transition was associated with worse psychological well-being whereas no relationship between retirement transitions and psychological well-being was found for rural male elders, urban female elders, and rural female elders. Associative factors of psychological well-being varied by gender and residential areas. The findings implies that a relationship between retirement transitions and psychological well-being of the elderly may differ by gender and residential areas, and these differential effects of retirement transitions may be attributable to different life experiences and economic activities through a life course and different roles after retirement. Also, different associative factors of psychological well-being for the four sub-samples reflect variations in their different life course.

Keywords

retirement;psychological well-being;gender;residential areas;a panel study