Sodium Salicylate Activates p38MAPK Though a Specific-Sensing Mechanism, Distinct from Pathways Used by Oxidative Stress, Heat Shock, and Hyperosmotic Stress

  • Kim, Jung-Mo (Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences and Research Institute of Genetic Engineering, Pusan National University) ;
  • Oh, Su-Young (Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences and Research Institute of Genetic Engineering, Pusan National University) ;
  • Kim, Min-Young (Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences and Research Institute of Genetic Engineering, Pusan National University) ;
  • Seo, Myoung-Suk (Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences and Research Institute of Genetic Engineering, Pusan National University) ;
  • Kang, Chi-Duk (Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Pusan National University) ;
  • Park, Hye-Gyeong (Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences and Research Institute of Genetic Engineering, Pusan National University) ;
  • Kang, Ho-Sung (Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences and Research Institute of Genetic Engineering, Pusan National University)
  • Published : 2003.12.01

Abstract

Sodium salicylate, a plant stress hormone that plays an important role(s) in defenses against pathogenic microbial and herbivore attack, has been shown to induce a variety of cell responses such as anti-inflammation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in animal cells. p38MAPK plays a critical role(s) in the cell regulation by sodium salicylate. However, the signal pathway for sodium salicylate-induced p38MAPK activation is yet unclear. In this study, we show that although sodium salicylate enhances reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a general ROS scavenger, did not prevent sodium salicylate-induced p38MAPK, indicating ROS-independent activation of p38MAPK by sodium salicylate. Sodium salicylate-activated p38MAPK appeared to be very rapidly down-regulated 2 min after removal of sodium salicylate. Interestingly, sodium salicylate-pretreated cells remained fully responsive to re-induction of p38MAPK activity by a second sodium salicylate stimulation or by other stresses, $H_2O$$_2$ and methyl jasmonate (MeJA), thereby indicating that sodium salicylate does not exhibit both homologous and heterologous desensitization. In contrast, pre-exposure to MeJA, $H_2O$$_2$, heat shock, or hyperosmotic stress reduced the responsiveness to subsequent homologous stimulation. Sodium salicylate was able to activate p38MAPK in cells desensitized by other heterologous p38MAPK activators. These results indicate that there is a sensing mechanism highly specific to sodium salicylate for activation of p38MAPK, distinct trom pathways used by other stressors such as MeJA, $H_2O$$_2$ heat shock, and hyperosmotic stress.