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Effect of Germination and Heating on Phytase Activity in Cereal Seeds

  • Ma, Xi (Animal Nutrition Institute of Northeast Agricultural University) ;
  • Shan, Anshan (Animal Nutrition Institute of Northeast Agricultural University)
  • Received : 2001.09.13
  • Accepted : 2002.02.15
  • Published : 2002.07.01

Abstract

The effect of germination on phytase activity in wheat NEAU123, triticale5305 and rye2 was studied in the present study. Germination significantly increased phytase activity by 2.04 times for wheat NEAU123 (3 d), 1.82 times for triticale 5305 (1 d) and 2.45 times for rye2 (1 d), respectively. It was safe for phytase in fresh malts kilned for 2 h at $40^{\circ}C$. Phytase in cereal seeds had strong heat stability. There was no loss of phytase activity in cereal seeds heated at $70^{\circ}C$ for 1 h, a little loss (${\leq}$5.46%) at $80^{\circ}C$ or $90^{\circ}C$. Even heated at $100^{\circ}C$, the phytase activity in wheat NEAU123, triticale5305 and rye2 remained 89.47%, 86.44% and 104.64%, respectively.

Keywords

Cereal Seeds;Germination;Phytase Activity;Heating Stability

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Department of Science and Technology of Heilongjiang Province and Ministry of Education of China

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