DOI QR코드

DOI QR Code

The Effects of Water Deprivation on Cerebrospinal Fluid Constituents During Feeding in Sheep

  • Sunagawa, Katsunori (Dept. of Animal Physiology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of the Ryukyus) ;
  • Weisinger, Richard S. (Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and Medicine, University of Melbourne) ;
  • McKinley, Michael J. (Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and Medicine, University of Melbourne) ;
  • Purcell, Brett S. (Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and Medicine, University of Melbourne) ;
  • Thomson, Craig (Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and Medicine, University of Melbourne) ;
  • Burns, Peta L. (Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and Medicine, University of Melbourne)
  • Received : 2000.08.28
  • Accepted : 2000.12.18
  • Published : 2001.04.01

Abstract

The internal humoral factors in the central regulation of dry feed intake during water deprivation in sheep were investigated by measurement of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) constituents. Five animals were fed dried alfalfa chaff for 2 hours once a day. Sheep in the water deprivation treatment were deprived of water for 28 hours, while the sheep in the control treatment were given free access to water. During the first hour of the 2 hour feeding period, a rapid reduction in blood volume occured in both treatments (water deprivation and free access to water). The CSF concentrations of Na, Cl and osmolality during the second hour of the 2 hour feeding period in both treatments were greater (p<0.01) than those during the first hour. The drinking behaviors in sheep were concentrated during the second hour of the 2 hour feeding period in periods of free access to water. Water intake during feeding in periods of free access to water was 1110 ml/2 h. The levels of increase in CSF osmolality with feeding during water deprivation were greater (p<0.01) than during periods of free access to water. The changes in CSF osmolality with feeding during water deprivation produced more vigorous thirst sensations in the brain compared to during periods of free access to water. The eating rates for the first hour of the allotted 2 hour feeding period were the same under both treatments. However, the eating rates for the second hour during water deprivation periods decreased significantly (p<0.05) compared to those during periods of free access to water. The decreased eating rates for the second hour during water deprivation may be due to the vigorous thirst sensations produced in the brain. The results suggest that the increase in CSF osmolality with feeding during water deprivation acts as a thirst and satiety factor in brain mechanisms controlling feeding to decrease dry feed intake in water-deprived sheep.

Keywords

CSF Osmolality;Brain;Thirst;Dry Feed Intake;Sheep