DOI QR코드

DOI QR Code

Effect of L-Carnitine and Source of Dietary Fat on Growth Performance and Serum Biochemical Parameters of Piglets Weaned at 35 Days of Age

  • Li, Defa (Ministry of Agriculture Feed Industry Center, China Agricultural University) ;
  • Qiao, Q. (Ministry of Agriculture Feed Industry Center, China Agricultural University) ;
  • Johnson, E.W. (Ministry of Agriculture Feed Industry Center, China Agricultural University) ;
  • Jiang, J. (Ministry of Agriculture Feed Industry Center, China Agricultural University) ;
  • Wang, F. (Ministry of Agriculture Feed Industry Center, China Agricultural University) ;
  • Blum, R. (Lonza LTD.) ;
  • Allee, G. (University of Missouri-Columbia)
  • Received : 1999.04.08
  • Accepted : 1999.06.10
  • Published : 1999.12.01

Abstract

The effects of carnitine in diets with or without added fat (5% lard or soybean oil) were evaluated in 72 Large White ${\times}$ Landrace ${\times}$ Duroc pigs weaned at 35 days of age. Pigs were fed a 1.30% lysine corn-soybean basal diet+15% dried whey+4% fish meal with carnitine at 0 or 50 mg/kg and either 0% added fat, 5% soybean oil or 5% lard for 6 weeks in a $2{\times}3$ factorial trial (6 treatments, 3 pens per treatment, 4 pigs per pen). Addition of carnitine increased average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) in the second two weeks of the six-week trial and overall, but had no significant effect on feed per gain (F/G). Lard alone depressed ADG (p<0.05) in the last two weeks of the trial and overall, but the ADG for pigs fed lard+carnitine was similar to the control. Lard reduced feed intake in the first two weeks of the trial (p<0.05). Carnitine reduced the percentage of pigs with poor (ADG<375 g/d) growth (15 vs 40%; p<0.05). The greater uniformity of growth was most evident in low-weaning-weight pigs in the second period (16 vs 62%, p<0.005). Addition of fat did not produce any positive effect on uniformity and had no interaction with carnitine on uniformity. Carnitine addition increased serum total carnitione and short-chain acyl-carnitine levels (p<0.05), but did not modify free carnitine levels. Serum carnitine levels were lower at weaning than at 14, 28, or 39 days after weaning (p<0.05). Carnitine increased serum protein levels on day 14 (p<0.05). Addition of fat in the form of soybean oil or lard did not improve piglet growth performance. Addition of 50 mg/kg of carnitine to the diet of weanling pigs enhanced postweaning performance.

Keywords

Carnitine;Fat;Weaning;Pig;Growth

Cited by

  1. Effects of increasing dietary L-carnitine on growth performance of weanling pigs1,2 vol.81, pp.9, 2003, https://doi.org/10.2527/2003.8192259x