Synthesis of Doped Polymethylphenylsilane Conductive Polymers and their Structure Characteristics

포리메틸페닐실란계 전도성 고분자의 합성과 구조 특성

  • Yang, Hyun-Soo (Dept. of Ind. Chem., Graduate School, Chungnam National University) ;
  • Kang, Phil-Hyun (Dept. of Ind. Chem., Graduate School, Chungnam National University) ;
  • Kim, Jeong-Soo (Dept. of Polymer Eng., Chungnam National University) ;
  • Ryu, Hae-il (Dep. of Chemistry Education, Kongju National University) ;
  • Kim, Young-Ho (Dept. of Ind. Chem., Graduate School, Chungnam National University)
  • 양현수 (충남대학교 대학원 공업화학과) ;
  • 강필현 (충남대학교 대학원 공업화학과) ;
  • 김정수 (충남대학교 공과대학 고분자공학과) ;
  • 류해일 (공주대학교 사범대학 화학교육과) ;
  • 김영호 (충남대학교 대학원 공업화학과)
  • Received : 1996.06.12
  • Accepted : 1996.09.02
  • Published : 1996.10.10

Abstract

Four kind of polysilanes which had side chains of methyl, phenyl, and mixed structures, were synthesized and modified by doping with iodine. The structural, thermal, and electric characteristics of obtained polymers were systematically observed with iodine, The structural, thermal, and electric characteristics of obtained polymers were systematically observed with FT-IR, UV/VIS, TGA/DTG, DSC, and measurement of electric conductivity. From FT-IR spectra, it was confirmed that the synthesized polysilanes had side chains of methyl, phenyl, and mixed structures. The thermal stabilities of the polymers were found to increase with phenyl substituents. The polysilanes with phenyl side groups showed ${\sigma}-{\sigma}*$ transition absorption at wavelengths longer than 350 nm. The bathochromic shift of polysilanes with phenyl substituents relates probably to the narrowed band gap caused by delocalization of ${\pi}$-electron. The polymers doped with iodine showed multi-step pyrolysis behavior and higher residue compared with that of the undoped polymers. The electric conductivities of the undoped and doped polysilanes were $10^{-5}S/cm$ and $10^{-4}S/cm$, respectively.

Keywords

Acknowledgement

Supported by : 한국학술진흥재단

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